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Can ?: lead to less efficient code compared to if/else when returning an object?

Foo if_else()
{
    if (bla)
        return Foo();
    else
        return something_convertible_to_Foo;
}

If bla is false, the returned Foo is directly constructed from something_convertible_to_Foo.

Foo question_mark_colon()
{
    return (bla) ? Foo() : something_convertible_to_Foo;
}

Here, the type of the expression after the return is Foo, so I guess first some temporary Foo is created if bla is false to yield the result of the expression, and then that temporary has to be copy-constructed to return the result of the function. Is that analysis sound?

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2  
I thought the first example would also have to create a temporary object? –  Cameron Aug 5 '11 at 13:44
1  
Compile the two into assembler and see for yourself. –  doron Aug 5 '11 at 13:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A temporary Foo has to be constructed either way, and both cases are a clear candidate for RVO, so I don't see any reason to believe the compiler would fail to produce identical output in this case. As always, actually compiling the code and looking at the output is the best course of action.

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Oh, I thought the semantics of returning an object would be direct initialization, but it seems it is copy-initialization instead. –  FredOverflow Aug 5 '11 at 14:03
    
Not so, as DeadMG points out, if the object has move semantics, only one of these methods will definately generate a temporary. –  Benj Aug 5 '11 at 15:36
    
@Benj: They both generate a temporary, but the compiler is allowed to optimize it out in cases like this. Given the situation DeadMG suggests, it is possible the standard does not allow elision of all possible copies/moves in the ternary operator case, but I'm not certain. It might also be that compilers simply don't perform that optimization yet; move constructors are a relatively new feature after all. –  Dennis Zickefoose Aug 5 '11 at 15:56
    
Yes apologies, they do both generate a temporary, I should have said that only in the ternary case does that temporary have to be the result of a copy construction and like you say, I'm not sure if that's compiler specific or a standard thing. –  Benj Aug 5 '11 at 16:11
    
Actually, when I ran this, the ternary method called both the copy and the move constructor... –  Benj Aug 5 '11 at 16:12

It most definitely can where rvalue references are enabled. When one of the two branches is an lvalue and the other an rvalue, whichever way you go, you're going to not get the correct function called for at least one of them. When you do the if statement way, then the code will call the correct move or copy constructor for the return.

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Why do you think that the move constructor wouldn't be called in the case of the ternary operator? I don't see why it wouldn't... –  Benj Aug 5 '11 at 14:38
    
Hey, you're right! I just tried this in the debugger. The ternary operator results in the copy constructor and the move constructor being called wheras the if/else just calls the move constructor. Why is this? –  Benj Aug 5 '11 at 14:52
    
@Benj: Because the operator can only have one value- an lvalue or an rvalue. That means that you're losing lvalue/rvalue data when you have one rvalue and one lvalue. –  Puppy Aug 5 '11 at 16:58

While I appreciate assembly output, I still find them a bit "too" low-level :)

For the following code:

struct Foo { Foo(): i(0) {} Foo(int i): i(i) {} int i; };
struct Bar { Bar(double d): d(d) {} double d; operator Foo() const { return Foo(d); } };

Foo If(bool cond) {
  if (cond) { return Foo(); }
  return Bar(3);
}

Foo Ternary(bool cond) {
  return cond ? Foo() : Bar(3);
}

Here is the LLVM IR generated by Clang

define i64 @If(bool)(i1 zeroext %cond) nounwind readnone {
entry:
  %retval.0.0 = select i1 %cond, i64 0, i64 3     ; <i64> [#uses=1]
  ret i64 %retval.0.0
}

define i64 @Ternary(bool)(i1 zeroext %cond) nounwind readnone {
entry:
  %tmp.016.0 = select i1 %cond, i64 0, i64 3      ; <i64> [#uses=1]
  ret i64 %tmp.016.0
}

By the way, the llvm try out demo now uses Clang :p

Since it is not the first time that the question comes up, in one form or another, I would like to remember that since semantically both forms are equivalent, there is no reason for a good compiler to treat them any differently as far as optimization and code generation are concerned. The ternary operator is just syntactic sugar.

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As always in case of performance question: measure for the case at hand, there are too many things to take into account to do any prediction.

Here, I'd not be surprised that some compilers have problems with one form or the other while others get rapidly to the same internal representation and thus generate exactly the same code.

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I will be surprised if there is any difference since the two are logically equivalent. But this will depend on the compiler.

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It depends on compiler. As far as i know, on most of compilers, if-else it's translated to cleaner ASM code and it's faster.

Edit: Assuming the code below

int a = 10;
int b = 20;
int c = 30;
int d = 30;
int y = 30;

y = (a > b) ? c : d;

if (a > b)
{
    y = c;
}
else
{
    y = d;
}

will be translated in ASM like this

    y = (a > b) ? c : d;
008C13B1  mov         eax,dword ptr [a] 
008C13B4  cmp         eax,dword ptr [b] 
008C13B7  jle         wmain+54h (8C13C4h) 
008C13B9  mov         ecx,dword ptr [c] 
008C13BC  mov         dword ptr [ebp-100h],ecx 
008C13C2  jmp         wmain+5Dh (8C13CDh) 
008C13C4  mov         edx,dword ptr [d] 
008C13C7  mov         dword ptr [ebp-100h],edx 
008C13CD  mov         eax,dword ptr [ebp-100h] 
008C13D3  mov         dword ptr [y],eax 

    if (a > b)
008C13D6  mov         eax,dword ptr [a] 
008C13D9  cmp         eax,dword ptr [b] 
008C13DC  jle         wmain+76h (8C13E6h) 
    {
        y = c;
008C13DE  mov         eax,dword ptr [c] 
008C13E1  mov         dword ptr [y],eax 
    }
    else
008C13E4  jmp         wmain+7Ch (8C13ECh) 
    {
        y = d;
008C13E6  mov         eax,dword ptr [d] 
008C13E9  mov         dword ptr [y],eax 
    }
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