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I am writing following code.

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
             FileInfo fiobj = new FileInfo(@"e:\mohan.txt");
             Console.Write("Name of file:"+ fiobj.Name);

             using(StreamWriter sw = fiobj.AppendText())
             {
                sw.WriteLine("mohan!");
             }
        }

    // code not working

    static void Main(string[] args)
        {
           FileInfo fiobj = new FileInfo(@"e:\mohan.txt");
           Console.Write("Name of file:"+ fiobj.Name);

           StreamWriter sw = fiobj.AppendText();            
           sw.WriteLine("mohan!");            
        }

When I use the "using(){}" block I am able to write into file but when I wrote the same code without using(){} block I am not able to do So. Why is So? As far as I know using(){} block specifies the scope of the object for it's life time. Does using(){} block doing something fancy here to make it enable to write the data to file.

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1  
Please define "I am not able to do So"? what happens? Note that using calls Dispose(), which would close the file - but since you don't do anything after it, there shouldn't be a noticeable difference here (the using version is more correct, note) –  Marc Gravell Aug 5 '11 at 13:45
    
What error do you get without the using block? Is it possible that the file is still locked from an earlier run of the application (e.g. it works the first time)? –  Stevo3000 Aug 5 '11 at 13:47
    
@Marc if he runs the program many times one of the processes might be locking it –  Oskar Kjellin Aug 5 '11 at 13:47
    
I am not getting any error. I am just not able to write into it. –  Mohan Mahajan Aug 5 '11 at 13:50
    
@Mohan then you probably just need to flush –  Oskar Kjellin Aug 5 '11 at 13:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The using is shorthand for correctly ensuring that your object is Disposed correctly once the scope falls outside of the using block.

Your code is equivalent to:

StreamWriter sw = fiobj.AppendText();
try
{
    sw.WriteLine("mohan!");
}
finally
{
    if (sw != null)
    {
        ((IDisposable)sw).Dispose();
    }
}

This code correctly closed and disposes of the StreamWriter. Without it, it would remain locked.

Source

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Without the using statement, you aren't closing the StreamWriter.
Therefore, the StreamWriter remains open and the file remains locked.

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Just for curiosity having question in mind that "As .NET provide managed code isn't it the responsibility of CLR to close the StreamWriter?" –  Mohan Mahajan Aug 5 '11 at 13:59
1  
@Mohan: Yes, but the GC is non-deterministic. Any IDisposable objects should always be explicitly disposed in using blocks as soon as possible. –  SLaks Aug 5 '11 at 14:02

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