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Which is better, nesting an if statement inside the if block, or inside the else block?

a.

if (cond1)
   if (cond2){
      statement1;
      statement2;
      ...
   }
   else {
      statement3;
      statement4;
      ...
   }

else {
   statement5;
   statement6;
   ...
}

b.

if (!cond1) {
   statement5;
   statement6;
   ...
}

else if (cond2) {
   statement1;
   statement2;
   ...
}

else {
   statement3;
   statement4;
   ...
}

Thanks for the replies so far. I just edited the options, but my main concern really is just this: If you have a choice, (by changing the conditional expressions) is it better to nest an if statement in a higher level if's if block or its else block? (a) is just an example of nesting the if in the if block, and (b) is an example of nesting the if in the else block. Thanks again for everyone's time.

share|improve this question
    
You should edit your example per Justin's comment. Are you looking for if (cond) ... else if (cond2) {...} else {...} versus if (cond) ... else { if (cond2) {...} else {...}}? Or as Justin says, the nested if versus the logical and? Thanks. –  Ray Toal Aug 5 '11 at 14:32
    
This is super ambiguous to read (and I don't even know the correct parse) so please do add curly braces around the blocks in the first case! –  Kerrek SB Aug 5 '11 at 14:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT: Thanks for clarifying the question. The question is now really one of style and comes down to what is most readable. Generally speaking the latter is nicer when you have a true multi-way conditional, meaning at some point in the code there are three possible conditions all equally likely and equally sensible. The former is cleaner perhaps when semantically cond1 is the real driver, and cond2 is a kind of subordinate condition that people only think about when cond1 is true.

OLD ANSWER:

Here is one interpretation of the question ("nesting inside of then"):

if (cond1) {
    if (cond2) {
        A
    }
} else {
    B
}

This should be written, as Justin points out, as

if (cond1 && cond2) {
    A
} else {
    B
}

unless there is code that needs to be in the if cond1 part that is not in the scope of the if cond2.

Another interpretation of your question ("nesting inside of else") is:

if (cond1) {
    A
} else {
    if (cond2) {
        B
    }
}

In this case you should rewrite as

if (cond1) {
    A
} else if (cond2) {
    B
}

Because it better expresses the idea of the multiway conditional. Again if there is something that belongs in the scope of not cond1 but not in the scope of the cond2, then you need to nest.

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
How can one of them be better when they aren't equivalent? A nested if is, at its simplest, an "Is this true? If it is, is that also true?". An else if is an "Is this true? If not, is that true?". –  Anthony Grist Aug 5 '11 at 14:49
    
I'm just guessing the OP's intent. If there is no edit forthcoming I will withdraw the answer. –  Ray Toal Aug 5 '11 at 14:50
    
@ ray: Yes, that is my intent. I just wanted to know whether it is better to nest an if statement in an if block or in an else block. –  Bill Aug 5 '11 at 17:03
    
@Ray I just made some clarification to the question, thanks. –  Bill Aug 5 '11 at 17:42
    
Thanks for the clarification, @Bill. I edited my answer to address the updated question (at the top). –  Ray Toal Aug 5 '11 at 18:09

Actually, your examples don't match. I would rewrite the first to be:

if(cond && cond2)
{

}
else
{

}

The only time I would nest if statements like your first example would be:

if(cond)
{
    if(cond2)
    {
        // Stuff that requires both conditions to be true.
    }

    // Stuff that requires only the first condition to be true.
}
else
{

}
share|improve this answer
    
Your two versions aren't equivalent! Consider cond = true and cond2 = false. –  Kerrek SB Aug 5 '11 at 14:35
    
@Kerrek SB - My two versions aren't meant to be equivalent. The second is meant to show a different condition when I would use nested if statements. –  Justin Niessner Aug 5 '11 at 14:38
    
That's fine IF the whole of your if block is another if statement. If you have other bits of code before or after that second if statement then attempting to combine it into one single decision structure would likely result in some nasty duplication of code. –  Anthony Grist Aug 5 '11 at 14:38
    
@Justin: Your first version also isn't equivalent to the OP's first version. I don't actually know which way round the OP's first version is interpreted, but neither way is the same as yours. –  Kerrek SB Aug 5 '11 at 14:42
    
@Justin I just made some clarification, thanks. –  Bill Aug 5 '11 at 17:45

Edit: In that case, I don't think either is necessarily better. In my opinion, (b) is much easier to read and follow logically. Either one will do though!

Does the else in (a) go with the first if statement or the second? By the way you indented, I would assume that it goes with the first if statement, but if that is the case, then your two examples aren't the same logically.

share|improve this answer
    
The 1st else belong to the nested if. I just edited the question now. –  Bill Aug 5 '11 at 17:39
    
Much clearer now :-) I edited my answer although now I see it is basically the same as what Ray said as well. –  love_me_some_linux Aug 5 '11 at 19:22

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