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This is my query:

SELECT B.RECORDID, A.ITEMCODE, A.ITEMNAME, A.STOCKINHAND, B.SALEPRICE 
FROM ITEMMASTER A, STOCKENTRY B 
WHERE A.ITEMID = B.ITEMID 
  AND RECORDID = (SELECT MAX(RECORDID) FROM STOCKENTRY 
                  WHERE ITEMID = A.ITEMID) 
  AND A.STOCKINHAND > 0 
  AND B.SALEPRICE > 0 
  AND B.INVOICEDATE IS NOT NULL 
ORDER BY A.ITEMNAME, B.INVOICEDATE;

Table B (StockEntry) may contain one or more records whereas Table A (ItemMaster) will definitely have only a single row for that ItemID.

If I remove the sub-query in the WHERE clause, it displays one or more rows. I feel that picking max(RecordID) through sub-query in the WHERE clause is slowing query. I do have indexes on RecordID, InvoiceDate, ItemID but still MySQL logs show that this query is not performing well. I can't change the column sequence for some reason.

Is there any better way to optimize this query?

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Not sure if the indexes in MySQL work similar to SQL Server, but for SQL Server I would add a covering index on Stockentry for ItemID, RecordID which should speed up the subselect substantially. –  JNK Aug 5 '11 at 15:15
    
@marc - he mentions MySQL in the next to last paragraph –  JNK Aug 5 '11 at 15:15
    
Do you have an average time of how long your current query takes? –  ace Aug 5 '11 at 15:24
    
@ace: Here is a link to my question at dba.stackexchange.com where I have posted query log: dba.stackexchange.com/questions/4358/… –  RKh Aug 5 '11 at 15:30
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's likely slow because it's running a correlated subquery for every row of the outer query. There are two solutions that tend to run more efficiently.

One is to use a derived table, which uses a subquery, but it only executes the subquery once to prepare the derived table.

SELECT B.RECORDID, A.ITEMCODE, A.ITEMNAME, A.STOCKINHAND, B.SALEPRICE 
FROM ITEMMASTER A
JOIN STOCKENTRY B ON A.ITEMID = B.ITEMID
JOIN (SELECT ITEMID, MAX(RECORDID) AS MAXRECORDID 
      FROM STOCKENTRY GROUP BY ITEMID) M
  ON (M.ITEMID, M.MAXRECORDID) = (B.ITEMID, B.RECORDID)
WHERE A.STOCKINHAND > 0 
  AND B.SALEPRICE > 0 
  AND B.INVOICEDATE IS NOT NULL 
ORDER BY A.ITEMNAME, B.INVOICEDATE;

The other solution is to use an exclusion join to find the row in B such that no other row exists with the same itemid and a greater recordid. With correct indexes (e.g. a compound index on (ITEMID, RECORDID), this should perform very well.

SELECT B.RECORDID, A.ITEMCODE, A.ITEMNAME, A.STOCKINHAND, B.SALEPRICE 
FROM ITEMMASTER A
JOIN STOCKENTRY B ON A.ITEMID = B.ITEMID 
LEFT OUTER JOIN STOCKENTRY B2
  ON B.ITEMID = B2.ITEMID AND B.RECORDID < B2.RECORDID
WHERE B2.ITEMID IS NULL 
  AND A.STOCKINHAND > 0 
  AND B.SALEPRICE > 0 
  AND B.INVOICEDATE IS NOT NULL 
ORDER BY A.ITEMNAME, B.INVOICEDATE;

This type of problem comes up frequently on Stack Overflow. I've added the greatest-n-per-group tag to the question so you can see other cases.


Re @RPK's comment:

I don't use MySQL QB myself, and that app has changed so many times I can't advise on how to use it. But in the mysql monitor (command-line), I use a combination of EXPLAIN and PROFILING to give me stats.

However, you made a comment about not being to modify (or create?) indexes. That's going to hamstring your attempts to optimize.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, using new join syntax and removing the correlated subquery for every row. –  KM. Aug 5 '11 at 15:24
    
@Bill: There is a correction in your first query. After WHERE you have left AND. –  RKh Aug 5 '11 at 15:38
    
@RPK: Thanks, I've corrected that. –  Bill Karwin Aug 5 '11 at 15:43
    
@Bill: Among the two queries which one you recommend? Is there any Query Analyzer tool with which I get actual stats? I am using MySQL Query Browser but it caches the results so I am not getting actual time taken. –  RKh Aug 5 '11 at 15:47
1  
@RPK: Depends on the internal implementation of the RDBMS. When you compare TOP to LIMIT, you're talking about Microsoft SQL Server vs. MySQL, and these are two completely different technologies. They each might optimize in different ways, so they might be slower or faster than using MAX(RecordID). Also presence of indexes, and choice of storage engine make optimization different. So there's no simple answer. –  Bill Karwin Aug 6 '11 at 22:10
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try using TOP 1 ... ORDER BY .. DESC, like this:

SELECT B.RECORDID, A.ITEMCODE, A.ITEMNAME, A.STOCKINHAND, B.SALEPRICE 
FROM ITEMMASTER A, STOCKENTRY B 
WHERE A.ITEMID = B.ITEMID 
  AND RECORDID = (SELECT top 1 RECORDID FROM STOCKENTRY 
                  WHERE ITEMID = A.ITEMID
                  order by RECORDID desc) 
  AND A.STOCKINHAND > 0 
  AND B.SALEPRICE > 0 
  AND B.INVOICEDATE IS NOT NULL 
ORDER BY A.ITEMNAME, B.INVOICEDATE;
share|improve this answer
    
I answered before MySql tag was added to the question, TOP is not MySql syntax –  KM. Aug 5 '11 at 15:17
    
@KM: MySQL is not recognizing "Top 1". –  RKh Aug 5 '11 at 15:24
    
@RPK, see my previous comment, try something like: (select RECORDID FROM STOCKENTRY limit 0,1 WHERE ITEMID = A.ITEMID order by RECORDID desc) but Bill Karwin's answer will preform much better. It is better to final all the "max" values in one query and join to them than to find the max one at a time for each row. –  KM. Aug 5 '11 at 15:28
    
@KM: Limit 1 works as suggested below by eykanal. –  RKh Aug 5 '11 at 15:30
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TOP is database-specific; you may want to use the MySQL alternative ORDER BY ... DESC LIMIT 1.

This SO post has a good overview of the different ways to implement LIMIT concept across databases.

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true. limit 1 works in MySQL. But I am not able to determine exact performance of queries as query results probably got cached. –  RKh Aug 5 '11 at 15:28
    
LIMIT is also database specific. –  Brian Hoover Aug 5 '11 at 15:28
    
@brian - good point, I didn't realize. Answer updated. –  eykanal Aug 5 '11 at 15:30
    
FWIW, TOP is supported by Sybase and Microsoft SQL Server. LIMIT is supported by MySQL, PostgreSQL, and SQLite. –  Bill Karwin Aug 5 '11 at 15:44
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My suggestion is create a view

CREATE VIEW `STOCKENTRY_V` AS 
SELECT ITEMID,MAX(RECORDID) AS RECORDID
FROM STOCKENTRY
GROUP BY ITEMID;

And you can do a simple join on 2 tables + the view. I'm interested how fast it will perform.

SELECT B.RECORDID, A.ITEMCODE, A.ITEMNAME, A.STOCKINHAND, B.SALEPRICE 
FROM ITEMMASTER A, STOCKENTRY B, STOCKENTRY_V C
WHERE A.ITEMID = B.ITEMID AND AND B.ITEMID = C.ITEMID
  AND B.RECORDID = C.RECORDID
  AND A.STOCKINHAND > 0 
  AND B.SALEPRICE > 0 
  AND B.INVOICEDATE IS NOT NULL 
ORDER BY A.ITEMNAME, B.INVOICEDATE;
share|improve this answer
    
Nice idea. Checking it out. –  RKh Aug 5 '11 at 15:51
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If the query is frequently used and performance is still an issue, you could create a table of the last record id for an item and keep it up to date using a trigger on the ITEMMASTER table.

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