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Check the following code sample:

public class Test
{
    private void process(Instance1 obj)
    {
        System.out.println("Process Instance 1");
    }

    private void process(Instance2 obj)
    {
        System.out.println("Process Instance 2");
    }

    /* 
    COMMENT THIS OUT - I DON'T HAVE THIS CODE IN REAL LIST. Only here to prove point 3 below calls this
    private void process(SuperClass obj)
    {
        System.out.println("Process superclass");
    }
    */

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Test test = new Test();
        Instance1 instance1 = test.new Instance1();
        Instance2 instance2 = test.new Instance2();
        SuperClass instance3 = test.new Instance1();

        // test #1          
        test.process(instance1);
        // test #2          
        test.process(instance2);
        // test #3 (compiler error unless there is a process(SuperClass obj) call)
        test.process(instance3);
        // test #4                      
        if(instance3 instanceof Instance1)
            test.process((Instance1)instance3);
        else if(instance3 instanceof Instance2)
            test.process((Instance2)instance3);

    }

    abstract class SuperClass
    {
    }

    class Instance1 extends SuperClass
    {
    }

    class Instance2 extends SuperClass
    {
    }
}

This gives the output:

Process Instance 1
Process Instance 2
Process superclass
Process Instance 1

I was hoping that test #3 would know to call the right function but it seems it does not. I suppose this is a compile time thing and not a runtime thing. Option #4 works but is ugly and I am hoping for a better way.

Update: To clarify the issue... I have an abstract class of which there exists two concrete implementations. What I would like is to have two overloaded methods in another class (one for each concrete class) and be able to call it without doing any instanceof ugliness. From what I know now, this isn't possible because this is a compile time issue and the compiler obviously doesn't know what concrete class it is when it isn't strongly typed.

share|improve this question
    
Search for "double dispatch". –  Artefacto Aug 5 '11 at 16:21

6 Answers 6

This isn't a matter of polymorphism. This is a matter of method overloading.

When you pass instance3 to process(), it will call process(SuperClass obj) because as far as the JVM is knows, instance3 is a SuperClass since that's what you declared it as.

If you want the desired behavior (test#3 printing out "Process Instance 1"), you should define your process() method like so:

private void process(SuperClass obj)
{
    System.out.println("Process " + obj.name());
}

And your classes like this:

abstract class SuperClass
{
    String name() {
        return "SuperClass";
    }
}

class Instance1 extends SuperClass
{
    String name() {
        return "Instance 1";
    }
}

class Instance2 extends SuperClass
{
    String name() {
        return "Instance 2";
    }
}

This will work because of dynamic (or late) method binding.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not really following this as a solution. What I need is for the correct process() function to be called. What is being printed out is irrelevant in the demo. I'm trying to find a better solution than using the instanceof operator. –  Collin Peters Aug 5 '11 at 18:36

Can you change SuperClass and Instances? If so, you should declare abstract method SuperClass.process() and implement it in the subclasses.

To make test#3 work, you could add casting: test.process((Instance1)instance3);. Ugly.

You could also define a factory class, and encapsulate type switching inside it. You'd have ProcessFactory with a ProcessObject getInstance(SuperClass obj) method that returns objects of type ProcessObjectInstance1 or ProcessObjectInstance2, with a method process(). ProcessFactory would work similar to your test#4.

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This is what I currently doing. Basically turning the problem inside out a bit. Not sure if this counts as a visitor pattern.

Basically I just added an executeProcessor(Test test) abstract function within SuperClass, and the concrete classes implicitly know which function to call so they can simply use a cast.

What do you think? Is this code smell? Or a neat solution?

public class Test
{
    private void process(Instance1 obj)
    {
        System.out.println("Process Instance 1");
    }

    private void process(Instance2 obj)
    {
        System.out.println("Process Instance 2");
    }

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Test test = new Test();

        // Test 1
        Instance1 instance1 = test.new Instance1();
        instance1.executeProcessor(test);

        // Test 2
        Instance2 instance2 = test.new Instance2();
        instance2.executeProcessor(test);

        // Test 3 (note this is not strongly typed)
        SuperClass instance3 = test.new Instance1();
        instance3.executeProcessor(test);
    }

    abstract class SuperClass
    {
        public abstract void executeProcessor(Test test);
    }

    class Instance1 extends SuperClass
    {

        @Override
        public void executeProcessor(Test test)
        {
            test.process((Instance1)this);
        }
    }

    class Instance2 extends SuperClass
    {

        @Override
        public void executeProcessor(Test test)
        {
            test.process((Instance2)this);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

As others have pointed out, this isn't really something you can do in Java. If you absolutely must, you can use reflection to do something like:

private void process(SuperClass obj)
{
  try
  {
     Class<? extends SuperClass> klass = obj.getClass();
     Method m = this.getClass().getMethod("process", klass);
     m.invoke(this, obj);
  }
  catch (Exception e)
  {
     // default behavior
     System.out.println("Process superclass");
  }
}

I would really follow one of the other suggestions however.

share|improve this answer

Couple suggestions for cleaner way to do what you are doing:

Options 1: Abstract method Define process() on Superclass, and override it on Instance1 and Instance2:

abstract class SuperClass
{
    public void process(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println("Process superclass");
    }
}

class Instance1 extends SuperClass
{
    @Override
    public void process(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println("Process Instance 1");
    }
}

class Instance2 extends SuperClass
{
    @Override
    public void process(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println("Process Instance 2");
    }
}

Option 2: Visitor Pattern Define an class that does the processing, and is an InstanceVisitor

public interface InstanceVisitor
{

    public void processSuperclass(Superclass obj, String[] args);

    public void processInstance1(Instance1 obj, String[] args);

    public void processInstance2(Instance2 obj, String[] args);

}

public class InstanceProcessor implements InstanceVisitor
{

    public void processSuperclass(Superclass obj, String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println("Process superclass");
    }

    public void processInstance1(Instance1 obj, String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println("Process Instance 1");
    }

    public void processInstance2(Instance2 obj, String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println("Process Instance 2");
    }

}

Then each subclass accepts a visitor, and calls the correct method:

abstract class SuperClass
{
    public void accept(InstanceVisitor v, String[] args)
    {
        v.visitSuperclass(this, args);
    }
}

class Instance1 extends SuperClass
{
    @Override
    public void accept(InstanceVisitor v, String[] args)
    {
        v.visitInstance1(this, args);
    }
}

class Instance2 extends SuperClass
{
    @Override
    public void accept(InstanceVisitor v, String[] args)
    {
        v.visitInstance2(this, args);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have a similar comment to the previous post. The process() function takes an instance of SuperClass as an argument. It doesn't have the process() function inside it. I am going to clarify the original question –  Collin Peters Aug 5 '11 at 18:41

Either make it a virtual function inside hierarchy:

abstract class SuperClass
{
    public void process() { System.out.println("Process super class"); } 
}

class Instance1 extends SuperClass
{
    public void process() { System.out.println("Process instance1"); } 
}

class Instance2 extends SuperClass
{
    public void process() { System.out.println("Process instance2"); } 
}

or check out various approaches to multiple dispatch that are not natively supported in Java.

share|improve this answer
    
The process() call takes a SuperClass (or sub-class) as an argument. It is not part of SuperClass –  Collin Peters Aug 5 '11 at 18:37

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