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I am trying to figure out how to take a file and divide in into sub-files using a keyword as the split indicator. In my case, I have a large file that looks like this:

Racecar
line2...
line3...
Racecar
line5...
line6...
line7...
line8...
Racecar
line10...

At each occurrence of the word Racecar I would like to split the file and make a subfile. Using the above example, File_1 would have 3 lines, File_2 would have 5 lines, and File_3 would have 2 lines. These files would look like this:

File_1:
Racecar
line2...
line3...

File_2:
Racecar
line5...
line6...
line7...
line8...

File_3:
Racecar
line10...

I realize something like sed or awk would be better suited for this, but I need to do this in Python. I'm really stuck on this for some reason. I tried to write something like this:

with open("bigfile", mode="r") as bigfile:
    reader = bigfile.readlines()
    for i,line in enumerate(reader):
        if line.startswith("Racecar"):
            header = line
            header_num = i

I seem to be getting stuck because I can't find a way to get the next occurrence of Racecar. I keep wanting to use the next() function, but obviously this doesn't work on strings. The file I am using is small enough to be read into memory. Can anyone help me with this? Thanks in advance.

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On QNX You don't need Python for that ;). QNX's split can split file when regexp/pattern is found. –  user712092 Sep 21 '12 at 8:56
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
with open("bigfile", mode="r") as bigfile:
    reader = bigfile.read()
    for i,part in enumerate(reader.split("Racecar")):
        with open("File_" + i+1, mode="w") as newfile:
            newfile.write("Racecar"+part)
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readlines returns a list, and you're calling split on it which doesn't exist. –  Chris Aug 5 '11 at 16:44
    
@Chris You are right, I've updated my answer. –  Vader Aug 5 '11 at 16:46
    
@Vader, reading a list of lines and then joining seems wasteful. How about just bigfile.read()? –  senderle Aug 5 '11 at 16:49
    
@You are also right :) Updated. –  Vader Aug 5 '11 at 16:53
    
+1 then :). (BTW, Whoever downvoted this should explain why.) –  senderle Aug 5 '11 at 17:01
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out_array = []
with open("bigfile", mode="r") as bigfile:
    for line in bigfile:
        if line.startswith("Racecar"):
            out_array.append(line)
        else:
            out_array[-1] += line

for i in range(len(out_array)):
    out_filename = "File%d.txt" % i
    with open(out_filename, mode="w") as out_file:
         out_file.write(out_array[i]);

There are probably more efficient ways, particularly of avoiding two loops. However if it's as small as you claim it shouldn't matter.

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Seems like you've found a way to get the next occurrence of Racecar. Your for loop will reach all of them eventually. The question is what to do when you reach them. I don't understand what you're going for with header, header_num, etc.

Seems like the thing to do is to iterate over the lines in bigfile as you do (though without the redundant readlines), and every time you hit a Racecar line, open a new output file.

As in:

with open("bigfile", mode="r") as bigfile:
    smallfile_prefix = "File_"
    file_count = 0
    smallfile = open(smallfile_prefix + str(file_count), 'w')
    for line in bigfile:
        if line.startswith("Racecar"):
            smallfile.close()
            file_count += 1
            smallfile = open(smallfile_prefix + str(file_count), 'w')
        else:
            smallfile.write(line)
    smallfile.close()

There are other ways to do this -- some variation on Vader's answer is probably better, for example -- but this seems closest to your original approach.

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