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How can I convert ticks to datetime and format them to "ss:fff"? My code:

   public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        private DispatcherTimer timer;
        private long _ticks = 0;

        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void Start(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            DateTime start = DateTime.UtcNow;
            timer = new DispatcherTimer(new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0, 1), DispatcherPriority.Normal, delegate
            {
                DateTime current = DateTime.UtcNow;
                TimeSpan elapsed = current - start;
                this.Show.Text = elapsed.TotalMinutes.ToString("00:00.000");
            }, this.Dispatcher);
            timer.Start();
        }

        private void Stop(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            timer.Stop();
        }
    }

It worked properly on mono (I think, I tried something like this and it worked), but it doesn't work on windows. What's wrong?

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1  
We need a bit more information than that. What is the error message that you are getting? –  RLH Aug 5 '11 at 17:21
2  
I hope that code is being used to show how much DispatchTimer can drift and not for [other] useful purposes... –  user166390 Aug 5 '11 at 17:24
    
"It doesn't work" doesn't describe what's going wrong... –  Jon Skeet Aug 5 '11 at 17:27
1  
Works as expected for me. –  CodesInChaos Aug 5 '11 at 17:29
    
I'm doing a timer app. When I click the start button, it just shows 00:000 (but it should be running). –  user360330 Aug 5 '11 at 17:39
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't want to use a DateTime format anyway if the operation takes longer than a minute (because the "ss" format will show 09 for 69 seconds.

This adjusts the elapsed time correctly for drift.

DateTime start = DateTime.UtcNow;
timer = new DispatcherTimer(new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0, 1), DispatcherPriority.Normal, delegate
{
    DateTime current = DateTime.UtcNow;
    TimeSpan elapsed = current - start;
    this.Show.Text = elapsed.TotalSeconds.ToString ("00.000 seconds"); // a double converted to string.
}, this.Dispatcher);

Edit:

Your code doesn't show you calling timer.Start () to actually start the timer.

It also doesn't show how you keep the timer from being garbage collected: this.elapsedtimer = timer;

Edit 2: The TotalSeconds.ToString ("00.000 seconds") uses this overload of Double.ToString.

share|improve this answer
    
How does that converter work? (I mean the format in ToString method) Also, wouldn't be faster to count ticks and then convert them? –  user360330 Aug 5 '11 at 17:47
    
It would be faster, but it won't work. ;-) Dispatcher timer isn't granular enough to execute your code 1 (100 nanosecond) tick at a time. Did you know a .net tick is not the same thing as 1/1000 of a second? –  agent-j Aug 5 '11 at 17:50
    
See Edit 2: The TotalSeconds.ToString ("00.000 seconds") uses an overload of Double.ToString. –  agent-j Aug 5 '11 at 17:54
    
Ok, this worked new DateTime(elapsed.Ticks).ToString("ss:fff"); but why this doesn't work if I use ticks which I count myself? –  user360330 Aug 5 '11 at 18:18
    
"A single tick represents one hundred nanoseconds or one ten-millionth of a second. There are 10,000 ticks in a millisecond." - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.datetime.ticks.aspx Timers are not precise enough. You can try to count milliseconds, but you can't count ticks yourself. –  agent-j Aug 5 '11 at 18:40
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