Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can I execute the body of a virtual method that lives on an abstract class which has been mocked using Rhino Mocks?

To be clear, I'm not trying to mock the behavior of the virtual method. I'm trying to /test/ the virtual method (on the mocked class).

Is this idea a blatant misuse of Rhino Mocks?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, that should be absolutely fine. I can't say I've tried it, but I'd be very surprised if it failed.

EDIT: I suspect you want the PartialMock method. Here's an example:

using System;
using Rhino.Mocks;

public abstract class Abstract
{
    public virtual int Foo()
    {
        return Bar() * 2;
    }

    public abstract int Bar();        
}

class Test
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MockRepository repository = new MockRepository();
        Abstract mock = repository.PartialMock<Abstract>();

        using (repository.Record())
        {
            Expect.Call(mock.Bar()).Return(5);
        }

        Console.WriteLine(mock.Foo()); // Prints 10
    }
}

EDIT: Or in my first attempt at AAA:

using System;
using Rhino.Mocks;

public abstract class Abstract
{
    public virtual int Foo()
    {
        return Bar() * 2;
    }

    public abstract int Bar();        
}

class Test
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // Arrange
        Abstract mock = MockRepository.GeneratePartialMock<Abstract>();
        mock.Stub(action => action.Bar()).Return(5);

        // Act
        int result = mock.Foo();

        // Assert
        mock.AssertWasCalled(x => x.Bar());
        // And assert that result is 10...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I should have been more clear in the question. I've tried it plainly, and it doesn't work. I was hoping someone would shed some light on how to test a virtual method that lives on an abstract class that's been instantiated using Rhino Mocks. –  lance Aug 5 '11 at 17:50
    
@lance: Yes, it would have been useful if you'd said that to start with... I'll try to reproduce the problem. –  Jon Skeet Aug 5 '11 at 17:51
    
@lance: I've posted an example which works for me... you may have a slightly harder time if your class isn't public or the abstract methods aren't public. I'm sure there are ways around this though - I haven't used Rhino for a while. –  Jon Skeet Aug 5 '11 at 17:56
    
I'm using Rhino Mock's AAA syntax, and it's failing for me. Are you able to repro success using the AAA syntax? –  lance Aug 5 '11 at 17:57
    
@lance: I haven't used the AAA style myself, but looking around it looks like it should be fine if you're happy with the stub behaviour for any abstract methods called by the virtual method you're calling. It sounds like you have rather more experience with the AAA approach than I do, so you're probably in a better place to experiment. –  Jon Skeet Aug 5 '11 at 18:01
show 4 more comments

You need to tell Rhino.Mocks to call back to the original implementation instead of doing its default behavior of just intercepting the call:

var mock = MockRepository.GenerateMock<YourClass>();
mock.Setup(m => m.Foo()).CallOriginalMethod(OriginalCallOptions.NoExpectation);

Now you can call the Foo() method on your mock object.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see the Setup method when generating the mock statically? –  lance Aug 5 '11 at 18:07
    
Hmmm... What version of Rhino.Mocks are you using? –  Patrick Steele Aug 5 '11 at 20:00
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.