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I'm writing a C++ project and building a DAG of various inheritance-related types. I've placed a breakpoint after construction and I'd like to view the DAG. The debugger however will only show the base class. It will name the most derived type next to the __vfptr entry, but I can't actually view it's contents and verify that they are what I expect them to be. Is there any way to view the most derived type in the Locals window directly?

I am targetting x64, if that's relevant.

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The debugger can only guess at the actual type, C++ doesn't support reflection. Use a cast expression: (foo)ptr –  Hans Passant Aug 5 '11 at 20:34
    
@Hans: The debugger knows the exact type. Apart from any theoretical argument I might make, it literally names the exact type in the debugger. It clearly says __vfptr (most derived type). I just can't explore the value. –  Puppy Aug 5 '11 at 21:18
    
It knows the exact type of the v-table pointer, it can tell from its value. What it doesn't know is the type of the object that contains that pointer. Have you tried the cast (it got munched, *(foo*)ptr) –  Hans Passant Aug 5 '11 at 21:23
    
I'm not looking for the object containing the pointer, just the object the pointer points to. I could cast, but since we're talking about easily over a hundred objects, it would not be feasible at all. –  Puppy Aug 5 '11 at 21:50
    
__vfptr is not an object pointer. It points to the v-table of the class. An array of function pointers to the virtual methods of the class. It isn't going to help you debug anything, you're on the wrong track. –  Hans Passant Aug 5 '11 at 21:56

1 Answer 1

The only way that seem to work for me is to tell debugger to properly show objects with help of autoexp.dat. Not sure what's how well it will work in vs2010, I'm still using 2008. This method is very suitable for smart pointers. If you are trying to look inside raw pointers then, I guess, you need to manually cast pointer in the watch/quick watch window. If it's some sort of smartpointer or a class that store that raw base pointer then you can simply get it done with autoexp.dat this way (assuming that your base ptr is called m_ptr):

smart_ptr<*>{
preview
(
    #if (($e.m_ptr)!=0)
    (
    #(
        "smart_ptr ",
        (*(($T1 *)$e.m_ptr))
    )
    )
    #else
    (
        #("<Bad Ptr>")
    )
)
children
(
    #(
        ptr: (*(($T1 *)$e.m_ptr))
    )
)

}

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