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SO, I need your help. I couldn’t find anything on that topic. Golang is a freshly baked language so it’s quite hard to find answers quick for a newcomers like me.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

The predeclared Go int type size is implementation-specific, either 32 or 64 bits (Numeric types).

Here's an example of converting big-endian ints to bytes (uint8s).

package main

import (
    "encoding/binary"
    "fmt"
    "reflect"
)

func IntsToBytesBE(i []int) []byte {
    intSize := int(reflect.TypeOf(i).Elem().Size())
    b := make([]byte, intSize*len(i))
    for n, s := range i {
        switch intSize {
        case 64 / 8:
            binary.BigEndian.PutUint64(b[intSize*n:], uint64(s))
        case 32 / 8:
            binary.BigEndian.PutUint32(b[intSize*n:], uint32(s))
        default:
            panic("unreachable")
        }
    }
    return b
}

func main() {
    i := []int{0, 1, 2, 3}
    fmt.Println("int size:", int(reflect.TypeOf(i[0]).Size()), "bytes")
    fmt.Println("ints:", i)
    fmt.Println("bytes:", IntsToBytesBE(i))
}

Output:

int size: 4 bytes
ints: [0 1 2 3]
bytes: [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3]

or

int size: 8 bytes
ints: [0 1 2 3]
bytes: [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3]
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1  
I was expecting much less cumbersome example (due to my blind believe Go has some kind of routines for these kind of tasks). But your example worked perfectly fine for me, thank you. – oddy Aug 5 '11 at 23:41
2  
It should be noted that type int is not guaranteed to be 32 bits. This is implementation specific. The current Go compilers all do have it, but the language spec does not mandate it so you should be careful when converting it to uint32. There may be data loss. – jimt Aug 6 '11 at 10:26
    
It's also worth noting that it's possible to write less cumbersome code when using explicitly sized integers. You can use binary.Write instead of calling binary.BigEndian.PutUint32 in a loop. – Evan Shaw Aug 7 '11 at 22:00
1  
@jimt Seems like Go 1.1 will no longer only have 32 bits. 64 bit ints will be supported, too. Now you know. See go.googlecode.com/hg/doc/… – Ztyx Mar 26 '13 at 23:51
    
Indeed. @peterSO 's answer would been to be updated as well, because IntsToBytesBE assumes int is 32 bits wide. – jimt Mar 27 '13 at 10:50

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