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Imagine that we have the following methods (pseudo C#):

static IEnumerable<T> Iterator<T>()
{
    switch (SomeCondition)
    {
        case CaseA:
            yield return default(T);
        case CaseB:
            yield return default(T);
            yield return default(T);
        case CaseC:
            yield return default(T);
        default:
            break;
    }
}

static IEnumerable<T> Array<T>()
{
    switch (SomeCondition)
    {
        case CaseA:
            return new[] { default(T) };
        case CaseB:
            return new[] { default(T), default(T) };
        case CaseC:
            return new[] { default(T) };
        default:
            break;
    }
}

Which one will consume less memory (and less GC cycles) if we have many calls to similar like this methods? Does it make sense to write your own Enumerable/Enumerator in order to implement this kind of Enumerable.Once() scenario?

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6  
What happened when you compiled and ran both samples in a release build with proper optimizations enabled? –  Anthony Pegram Aug 6 '11 at 3:34
5  
Neither is likely to be a bottleneck , pick the most readable one. –  Henk Holterman Aug 6 '11 at 7:28
    
Do the methods have to have exactly those signatures? Is this definitely a bottleneck? What's the use case? There are some interesting options here, but we need more information. –  Jon Skeet Aug 10 '11 at 13:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This one is faster than both the others:

static T[] Array<T>()
{
    switch (SomeCondition)
    {
        case CaseA:
            return new[1];
        case CaseB:
            return new[2];
        case CaseC:
            return new[1];
        default:
            break;
    }
}

But it really isn't going to matter much.

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It depends on the T. A large struct, strings, or byte arrays, for example, would do better with an iterator. But in general, for one or two items the array is probably smaller.

But that misses the point. The whole reason it's faster is because the problem space is so small as to be not significant to performance: one or two item sequences are unlikely to be the driving factor for the performance of your app. In that scenario, rather than performance I would be much more worried about other factors like clarity, maintainability, and creating good habits.

Of those, you could argue that the array is clearer or cleaner, because programmers who have not yet encountered iterators can still understand it easily. Personally, I prefer the yield iterator, because I want to be in the habit of reaching for iterators before arrays because iterators tend to have better performance characteristics, and I want to encourage the same habit in others.

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+1 - "I would be much more worried about other factors like clarity, maintainability, and creating good habits" Completely agree! –  Brian Dishaw Aug 7 '11 at 23:02
    
Do you have some performance numbers to back up your claim? Because AFAICS, the number of copies for the array or the iterator would be equal (the array pays all at once, the iterator pays piecemeal as each is returned). When the number of elements is non-trivial, the array could take a performance hit because it uses more memory, but iterating an array is faster in most cases than iterating an enumerable. yield return has some overhead of its own, to keep track of the coroutine state. –  Ben Voigt Aug 7 '11 at 23:18

Arrays take less memory and cycles, but if you want to act on the returned data, you would want to go with Iterators as iterators implement best of algorithms which would speed things up eventually.

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