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I am using the function from Code project to deep clone my objects

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/tips/SerializedObjectCloner.aspx?msg=3984032#xx3984032xx

however for performance sensitive applications i am having a performance penalty that is about 10% of the execution time.

Can some please suggest to me another method of creating a copy of an object and having a smaller performance penalty? My object is quite large and contains lists of objects which in turn contain list of objects etc.

Thanks,

Joseph

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Why do you think that doing inherently slow things should be fast? –  siride Aug 6 '11 at 4:39
    
@siride: that's not helpful. The OP already admits that it's slow, and he wants alternatives. –  Chris Aug 6 '11 at 4:40
    
@Chris: if he wants to keep doing a deep copy, it'll have to be slow. If he wants another way of getting vaguely equivalent behavior (like COW or shallow copy when deep copy isn't really needed), then he should have specified that. As it is, the question doesn't really give us an out. –  siride Aug 6 '11 at 4:43
    
@siride: the article is using serialization for the copies, which is probably the slowest way I can think of to copy an object (a regular deep copy would be faster, at least marginally). Maybe you could just suggest those exact solutions and when each should be used. –  Chris Aug 6 '11 at 4:50

4 Answers 4

I can suggest a couple of approaches but they are not necessarily super-simple to implement. The two approaches I personally would chose between to do this are:

  1. Use code generation such as T4 to generate code that clone your object graphs. T4 is part of Visual Studio 2008 and Visual Studio 2010 and Oleg Sych has some great T4 documentation: http://www.olegsych.com/2007/12/text-template-transformation-toolkit/

  2. Use System.Linq.Expression to at runtime generate delegates that clones your object. In general reflection is slow because of GetValue/SetValue. System.Linq.Expression however allows you generate methods from reflection that are "hard-coded" against your classes. These methods you then cache thus paying the price for reflection only once.

Both of these approaches should give your performance that is comparable to if you were hand-coding the deep clone logic.

Things that complicates the life for deep cloning:

  1. Interface fields
  2. Abstract class fields
  3. Classes with private constructors (for help see http://msdn.microsoft.com/nb-no/library/system.runtime.serialization.formatterservices.getuninitializedobject.aspx)
  4. Collection fields

Writing a fully-fledged deep-cloner is a bit hairy but as you know your domain you might be able to do some simplifications to the problem.

PS. I personally prefer T4 over System.Linq.Expression as that is less "magic"

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If you can accept decorating your object graph a bit you could use protobuf-net. (You can get it using nuget for instance)

A trivial example:

[Serializable]
[ProtoContract]
public class TestObject
{
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public string TestProperty { get; set; }
}

public static class ObjectCopier
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Perform a deep Copy of the object.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">The type of object being copied.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="source">The object instance to copy.</param>
    /// <returns>The copied object.</returns>
    public static T Clone<T>(T source)
    {
        if (!typeof(T).IsSerializable)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("The type must be serializable.", "source");
        }

        // Don't serialize a null object, simply return the default for that object
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(source, null))
        {
            return default(T);
        }

        Stream stream = new MemoryStream();
        using (stream)
        {
            Serializer.Serialize<T>(stream, source);
            stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
            return Serializer.Deserialize<T>(stream);
        }
    }
}

Note: Serializer actually has a DeepClone method which would seem suitable for this but I found it to be slower than doing Serialize followed by Deserialize.

UPDATE: With regards to Mark's question, that does seem very odd. This is my (very limited) test that seems to be consistently about 30% slower using deep clone. (Note: Even when running the tests in different order and not running them in parallell)

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestWithStream()
    {
        var objects = Enumerable.Range(0, 1000000).Select(_ => new TestObject { TestProperty = Guid.NewGuid().ToString() }).ToList();

        Stopwatch w = Stopwatch.StartNew();

        for (int i = 0; i < objects.Count; ++i)
        {
            ObjectCopier.CloneWithStream(objects[i]);
        }
        Console.WriteLine(w.Elapsed);
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestWithDeepClone()
    {
        var objects = Enumerable.Range(0, 1000000).Select(_ => new TestObject { TestProperty = Guid.NewGuid().ToString() }).ToList();

        Stopwatch w = Stopwatch.StartNew();

        for (int i = 0; i < objects.Count; ++i)
        {
            ObjectCopier.CloneWithDeepClone(objects[i]);
        }
        Console.WriteLine(w.Elapsed);
    }

    public static class ObjectCopier
    {
        public static T CloneWithStream<T>(T source)
        {
            if (!typeof(T).IsSerializable)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("The type must be serializable.", "source");
            }

            if (Object.ReferenceEquals(source, null))
            {
                return default(T);
            }

            Stream stream = new MemoryStream();
            using (stream)
            {
                Serializer.Serialize<T>(stream, source);
                stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
                return Serializer.Deserialize<T>(stream);
            }
        }

        public static T CloneWithDeepClone<T>(T source)
        {
            if (!typeof(T).IsSerializable)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("The type must be serializable.", "source");
            }

            if (Object.ReferenceEquals(source, null))
            {
                return default(T);
            }

            return Serializer.DeepClone(source);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I find your finding odd; DeepClone simply does a serialize to MemoryStream, rewind, deserialize. Do you have a repro? –  Marc Gravell Aug 6 '11 at 10:23
    
Hmm. I'm probably doing something wrong then. Updating the answer with some repro-code –  alun Aug 6 '11 at 10:47

Creating a deep copy of a general clr object is not possible without using a general serializer (such as BinaryFormatter) or implementing manual copying for your entire hierarchy. If the BinaryFormatter is too slow you must either fall back to manual serialization, or find/ implement a faster formatter. Note that most protobuf implementations will not work out of the box with general object graphs (serializing delegates, singletons, null collections, ...). So first investigate if your graph allows protobuf serialization, potentially you can serialize with BinaryFormatter and use protobufs or manual binarywriting for certain subgraphs (stored using ISerializable) where possible

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You can use reflection to get all the private fields of the object. Create a function to loop through the private fields of the object. Take any value types and copy the value. If the object supports the ICloneable interface, call that. Recursive call this clone function for the reference types in the class.

Edit, heres the code for this: I believe I got the CloneDictionary from somewhere on the internet but i don't remember where now. Also, I just converted this from VB.net To C#.

  public static object GenericClone(object Obj)
{


object Out = null;
Out = Activator.CreateInstance(Obj.GetType());

Type mytype = Obj.GetType();
while (mytype != null) {

    foreach (System.Reflection.FieldInfo item in mytype.GetFields(System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance)) {
        object itemValue = item.GetValue(Obj);
        object newvalue = null;
        if (itemValue != null) {
            if (typeof(System.ICloneable).IsAssignableFrom(itemValue.GetType())) {
                newvalue = ((System.ICloneable)itemValue).Clone();
            } else {
                if (itemValue.GetType().IsValueType) {
                    newvalue = itemValue;
                } else {
                    if (itemValue.GetType().Name == "Dictionary`2") {
                        newvalue = DataInterface.CloneDictionary(itemValue);
                    } else if (object.ReferenceEquals(itemValue.GetType(), typeof(System.Text.StringBuilder))) {
                        newvalue = new System.Text.StringBuilder(((System.Text.StringBuilder)itemValue).ToString());
                    } else if (itemValue.GetType().Name == "List`1") {
                        newvalue = DataInterface.CloneList(itemValue);
                    } else {
                        throw (new Exception(item.Name + ", member of " + mytype.Name + " is not cloneable or of value type."));
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        //set new obj copied data
        mytype.GetField(item.Name, System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance).SetValue(Out, newvalue);
    }
    //must move up to base type, GetFields does not return inherited fields
    mytype = mytype.BaseType;
}

return Out;
}

public static Dictionary<K, V> CloneDictionary<K, V>(Dictionary<K, V> dict)
{
Dictionary<K, V> newDict = null;

// The clone method is immune to the source dictionary being null.
if (dict != null) {
    // If the key and value are value types, clone without serialization.
    if (((typeof(K).IsValueType || object.ReferenceEquals(typeof(K), typeof(string))) && (typeof(V).IsValueType) || object.ReferenceEquals(typeof(V), typeof(string)))) {
        newDict = new Dictionary<K, V>();
        // Clone by copying the value types.
        foreach (KeyValuePair<K, V> kvp in dict) {
            newDict[kvp.Key] = kvp.Value;
        }
    } else {
        newDict = new Dictionary<K, V>();
        // Clone by copying the value types.
        foreach (KeyValuePair<K, V> kvp in dict) {
            newDict[kvp.Key] = DataInterface.GenericClone(kvp.Value);
        }
    }
}

return newDict;
}

public static List<T> CloneList<T>(List<T> list)
{

List<T> Out = new List<T>();
if (typeof(System.ICloneable).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(T))) {
    return (from x in list(T)((ICloneable)x).Clone()).ToList;
} else if (typeof(T).IsValueType) {
    return (from x in list(T)x).ToList;
} else {
    throw new InvalidOperationException("List elements not of value or cloneable type.");
}

}

share|improve this answer
    
Reflection is slow.... (relatively speaking) and lists etc are non-trivial here –  Marc Gravell Aug 6 '11 at 10:22
    
I've had good luck with it, in terms of speed its hard to say what the size of my data is compared to the OP. Also, I'v found you can speed up reflection operations by caching results in shared dictionaries (since your types are unlikely to change at runtime). I've also added the functions I use for lists and dictionaries into the mix, combined It clones all the classes I use. –  Kratz Aug 6 '11 at 14:29

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