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In PHP , i've used the following code :

echo strtotime("today")."<br>";
echo strtotime("06/08/2011")."<br>";

I'm getting two different outputs :O

Why is that ?

Thanks

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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You get different outputs because the second one is not today, as you think. The second date is read actually as 08 June 2011.

If you write this code:

echo date("d M Y @ H:i", strtotime("today"))."<br/>";
echo date("d M Y @ H:i", strtotime("06/08/2011"))."<br/>";

You can see what I'm saying.

The second line should be:

strtotime("08/06/2011");
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thanks for that! :D –  Anant Aug 6 '11 at 6:37
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06/08/2011 is being interpreted as month-day-year, so June 8th, 2011.

From the docs:

Note:

Dates in the m/d/y or d-m-y formats are disambiguated by looking at the separator between the various components: if the separator is a slash (/), then the American m/d/y is assumed; whereas if the separator is a dash (-) or a dot (.), then the European d-m-y format is assumed.

To avoid potential ambiguity, it's best to use ISO 8601 (YYYY-MM-DD) dates or DateTime::createFromFormat() when possible.

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Because in some locales "6/8/2011" means "June 8", and in other locales it means "August 6".

For me (in the U.S.), it means "June 8".

Here's the PHP documentation which discusses setlocale() and LC_TIME:

http://php.net/manual/en/function.setlocale.php

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strtotime("today"); is getting the exact time it is right now.

You can run time() to get the same result.

strtotime("06/08/2011") is getting the time at midnight (00:00) of the day you specified.
By the way, the day you specified is June 08, 2011. PHP doesn't handle dd/mm/yyy by default. You would have to specify that that's your locale default setting.

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It also depends on PHP version:

  • in PHP 4.4.6: "today" is identical to "now", actual datetime
  • in PHP 5.1.4: "today" means the midnight of today

Source

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