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I've never needed to do this before but since both have to be the 'first' line in the constructor how should one tackle it? What's the best refactoring for a situation like this?

Here's a sample:

public class Agreement extends Postable {


public Agreement(User user, Data dataCovered)
{
    super(user);
    this(user,dataCovered,null);

}

public Agreement(User user,Data dataCovered, Price price)
{
    super(user);

    if(price!=null)
        this.price = price;

    this.dataCovered = dataCovered;


}
   ...
}

The call to super(user) is an absolute must. How to deal with "optional parameters" in this case? The only way I can think of is repetition i.e., don't call this(...) at all. Just perform assignments in every constructor.

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2  
no need for super(user) in first method, you will call it by calling this(user,dataCovered,null) –  Eng.Fouad Aug 6 '11 at 8:05
1  
The simplest is surely not to provide the first constructor at all if all it needs to do is included in the second. Just document that Price can be passed null. –  Mat Aug 6 '11 at 8:06
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You cannot call both super(..) and this(...). What you can do is re-work the structure of your overloadeded constructors, so that the last one to be called will call super(...). If that is not an option, you'll have to do the assignments in every constructor.

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I knew it had to be something this simple!! Ofcourse! I guess I was refactoring with the supers() already in place and hence the confusion!!! –  PhD Aug 6 '11 at 8:10
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If you call this(user,dataCovered,null), the second constructor will be called, and the first thing it will do is call the super constructor. So the line super(user); in the first constructor is unnecessary.

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You and S.L are were just 4 seconds apart on the answer!! I'll still mark S.L's as an answer, would help bump up his/her rating...hope you don't mind :) –  PhD Aug 6 '11 at 8:12
    
@Nupul Mark the better answer as the solution; current rating should not trump answer quality. –  dlev Aug 6 '11 at 8:17
    
I agree with that. @Nupul, the polite thought is much appreciated. But please mark the one as answer that you find best. –  S.L. Barth Aug 6 '11 at 8:18
    
@dlev: Agreed. From my point of view both answers are exactly the same as per quality/information S.L has also mentioned the case of what to do if his option is not possible. I wouldn't EVER mark an answer for bumping someone's rating!!! It's just that I have to choose between two answers, 4 seconds apart from each other and just thought will let Mark (and others) know my choice. –  PhD Aug 6 '11 at 8:20
    
@S.L. Note that I'm not commenting on the relative quality of the answers in this case :). I'm just saying that in general, the highest quality answer (that actually solved your problem) should be marked as the solution. –  dlev Aug 6 '11 at 8:20
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I would separate out the logic you need to perform in the constructor in a static method in the class, and just call it froum both constructors, to avoid duplication. However, in your case, you can just skip the call to super(user) from the first constructor, and the second one will call it for you :). And I would reverse the "dependencies" between the constructors, like this:

public class Agreement extends Postable {


public Agreement(User user, Data dataCovered)
{
    super(user);
    setDataCovered(dataCovered);

}

public Agreement(User user, Data dataCovered, Price price)
{
    this(user, dataCovered);

    if(price!=null)
        setPrice(price);

}

private static void setDataCovered(Data dataCovered) {
     this.dataCovered = dataCovered;
}

private staitc void setPrice(Price price) {
     this.price = price;
}
}
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So you would change price and dataCovered to be static fields? –  pvblivs Aug 6 '11 at 8:15
    
@Erik: Interesting take. But it seems calling super on the last 'called' constructor in the 'chain' seems to be a simpler option! –  PhD Aug 6 '11 at 8:17
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In constructors there are (among others like calling not instance methods from or within super or this) those three restrictions:

  • Only one call of super(...) or this(...) per constructor
  • super or this always have to be the first statement in the method
  • If you do not provide any of these you have an implicit super() at the beginning of the constructor

The reason for this is that an object can only be created once. And super is creating an object by calling the overloaded constructor while this is delegating to another constructor of the same class.

As another answer is saying in your case you do not need the first super as your this statement is delegating to the other constructor which is already calling super(user).

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