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Are Locks AutoCloseable? That is, instead of:

Lock someLock = new ReentrantLock();
someLock.lock();
try
{
    // ...
}
finally
{
    someLock.unlock();
}

can I say:

try (Lock someLock = new ReentrantLock())
{
    someLock.lock();
    // ...
}

in Java 7?

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2  
you can make a request to have them do that –  ratchet freak Aug 6 '11 at 8:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, neither the Lock interface (nor the ReentrantLock class) implement the AutoCloseable interface, which is required for use with the new try-with-resource syntax.

If you wanted to get this to work, you could write a simple wrapper:

public class LockWrapper implements AutoCloseable
{
    private final Lock _lock;
    public LockWrapper(Lock l) {
       this._lock = l;
    }

    public void lock() {
        this._lock.lock();
    }

    public void close() {
        this._lock.unlock();
    }
}

Now you can write code like this:

try (LockWrapper someLock = new LockWrapper(new ReentrantLock()))
{
    someLock.lock();
    // ...
}

I think you're better off sticking with the old syntax, though. It's safer to have your locking logic fully visible.

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4  
+1 I'd probably already lock() in the constructor. –  FredOverflow Aug 6 '11 at 9:35
10  
Just to clarify for beginners reading this: In real code you should not create a new lock every time you're locking it, because that removes its function. –  Bart van Heukelom Dec 4 '11 at 14:46
    
actually, you would want to put the lock call in the constructor, outside of the finally handling. –  jtahlborn Jun 12 '12 at 16:20
2  
The wrapper is not correctly done and is going to cause trouble. Just ask yourself: in the old way, why the lock() statement is put outside the try block. –  Adrian Shum Apr 23 '13 at 2:23

I was looking into doing this myself and did something like this:

public class CloseableReentrantLock extends ReentrantLock implements AutoCloseable { 
   public CloseableReentrantLock open() { 
      this.lock();
      return this;
   }

   @Override
   public void close() {
      this.unlock();
   }
}

and then this as usage for the class:

public class MyClass {
   private final CloseableReentrantLock lock = new CloseableReentrantLock();

   public void myMethod() {
      try(CloseableReentrantLock closeableLock = lock.open()) {
         // locked stuff
      }
   }
}
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1  
This is what I'm currently doing, and it's making development a breeze. Can't +1 this enough. –  corsiKa Jun 27 '13 at 21:00
    
This is the way it should be done. Only, why not call that method lock() instead of open()? –  Thomas Ahle Dec 10 '13 at 21:50
    
Because the override is close and open/close go together better than lock/close (they sounds like they do the same thing). –  Stephen Jul 24 '14 at 15:25
    
For this to work the method needs to return the object, but lock() is inherited from ReentrantLock and has a void return type. Since lock() is not available without breaking the inheritance, open() makes sense to go with close(). –  Andrew Oct 24 '14 at 15:26

The try-with-resource works well for resources which are created and destroyed when try-block is left. It does not work for resources which need to be kept alive. Locks are not created and destroyed upon each usage. They are kept alive and just locked and unlocked. This is why they are not AutoClosable.

As others already suggested a wrapper can be used to be created and destroyed by the try-with-resource block and to do the locking and unlocking upon creation and destruction.

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