Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to identify what properties(strings) are processed by a method. So, I have designed my method as below.

void method1( std::vector<String> * myVector )
{
   myVector = new std::vector<String>();  
   //do something;
   myVector->push_things;
}

So, I would call method1 from topMethod() like this.

topMethod()
{
   std::vector<String> * aVector = 0;
   method1( aVector );
   //process aVector to identify its contents;
}

Now, the vector myVector in method1() is getting populated fine. But its contents are unable at the caller method i.e., topMethod(). I'm not sure how they are getting freed. I feel that I'm allocating using new, so they should ideally be present at the caller location after the call..

Please provide your thoughts on what is going wrong.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should pass the pointer to vector by reference.
You are allocating to a copy of the pointer to vector you passed not the pointer you passed.

void method1( std::vector<int>* & myVector )

This should fix it.

share|improve this answer
    
"You are allocating to a copy of the pointer to vector you passed not the pointer you passed." so, if I create a new vector in topMethod and then assign the address to the incomming pointer, then should it work? method1( * vectorPTR ) { vector<string> newVector; vectorPTR = & newVector; } –  Pavan Aug 6 '11 at 10:11
    
The copy happens because you are using pass by value and not pass by referenceso no it wont work.vectorPTR is not the pointer you passed but a copy of it. –  Alok Save Aug 6 '11 at 10:12
add comment

Because you're not passing the pointer as reference:

Try this:

void method1( std::vector<int>* & myVector )
{                          //  ^^^ note this!
   myVector = new std::vector<int>();  
   myVector->push_back(100);
}
//call it 
std::vector<int> *v;
method1(v);

Or this:

void method1(std::vector<int> & myVector )
{
   myVector.push_back(100);  //myVector is not a pointer now!
}
//call it 
std::vector<int> v;
method1(v);

Personally, I would prefer the following:

std::vector<int> method1()
{
   std::vector<int> myVector;
   myVector.push_back(100); 
   return myVector;
}
//call it 
std::vector<int> v = method1();
share|improve this answer
1  
The third code snipped is definitely the best practice. –  Alexandre C. Aug 6 '11 at 10:09
1  
And compilers nowadays implement named return value optimization, so the third code snippet may be just as fast as the second code snippet. –  In silico Aug 6 '11 at 16:17
add comment

Along with other answers that tell you why your solution is wrong, I'll propose how to do it in a proper C++ way. Use references

void method1(std::vector<int>& v)
{
    v.push_things;
}

int main()
{
   std::vector<int> v;
   method1(v);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

If your method's job is to create a new vector, then return it:

std::vector<int>* method1()

If you need extra signaling in return value, create more vectors, etc use this:

.. method1( std::vector<int>*& myVector, ..)

If your method's only job is to manipulate a vector:

.. method1( std::vector<int>& myVector)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.