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I have a scenario where I pass a data 'request' object into a service and the service itself must create a number of different 'processors' depending on the data in the request.

Each processor can itself be one of a number of different types. So for example, a crude ugly implementation might look like:

public Collection<IProcessor> UglyCreationalMethod(Request request)
{
    var processors = new Collection<IProcessor>();

    if(request.Type == RequestType.SomeVal)
    {
        if(request.Id > 1000)
        {
            processors.Add(new ProcessLargeRequest(request));
        }
        else
        {
            processors.Add(new ProcessSmallRequest(request));
        }
    }
    else (request.Type == RequestType.SomeOtherVal)
    {
        if(request.Source == RequestSource.User)
        {
            processors.Add(new ProcessUserRequest(request));
        }
        else
        {
            processors.Add(new ProcessCorpRequest(request));
        }
    }

    if(request.SomeProp == "blah")
        processors.Add(new ProcessBlahRequest(request));

    // ... etc ad infinitum :)

    return processors;
}

I'm looking for a pattern that's extensible and hides the nasty logic that determines the types of processors the service needs to create, so it's a bit cleaner and more maintainable than the above ugly code.

I know about factory methods, but these alone will not suffice.

Suggestions appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Out of curiosity, why won't factory methods suffice? –  Joeblackdev Aug 6 '11 at 10:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you want to do is to create a Factory, the main question is how do you want to configure it. I like to follow an approach where choosing which method should be created resides within responsibilities of Factory not in classes that are being created - it leads to better configurability and it's easier to manage.

I would create something like this:

    public struct ProcessorCreationSettings
    {
        public Predicate<Request> Predicate;
        public Func<Request, IProcessor> Creator;
    }

    public class ProcessorFactory
    {
        protected static List<ProcessorCreationSettings> settings = new List<ProcessorCreationSettings>();

        static ProcessorFactory()
        {
            settings.Add(new ProcessorCreationSettings
            {
                Predicate = r => r.Type == RequestType.SomeOther && r.Id > 1000,
                Creator = r => new ProcessLargeRequest(r)
            });
            settings.Add(new ProcessorCreationSettings
            {
                Predicate = r => r.Type == RequestType.SomeOther && r.Id <= 1000,
                Creator = r => new ProcessSmallRequest(r)
            });
        }

        public List<IProcessor> Create(Request request)
        {
            return settings
                .Where(s => s.Predicate(request))
                .Select(s => s.Creator(request))
                .ToList();
        }
    }

The configuration part is done by static list, however you can use an IoC container for this as well, if it has such feature.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd argue that putting the rules in code isn't often a great practice. Rules change quite often...use configuration to dicate which rules govern the instantiation. –  dotnetnate Aug 7 '11 at 3:32
    
@dotnetnate: I'd argue quite opposite. First of all, rules changing often is simply a myth in most scenarios. Second, try maintaining thousands of lines of xml files - Java folks used to do that for almost everything - ask them what kind of PITA it is for them. Why do you think that configuration via Fluent Interfaces is so popular these days? Third, in the age of CI and automatic Unit Testing I see no advantage of xml for rapid requirement changes. Fourth - assuming that conf. is indeed placed in xml, do you allow users to change it to whatever they like? If no, you still need to recompile. –  kstaruch Aug 7 '11 at 11:13
    
This is the answer that's closest to what I'm looking for, I think I can work with this. –  MalcomTucker Aug 7 '11 at 12:28

One pattern that springs to mind is Chain of responsibility (perhaps not a creation pattern)

Firstly, you need RequestHandlers

public interface IRequestHandler
    {
        bool CanHandle(Request req);

        void Handle(Request req);
    }

    public class LargeRequestHandler : IRequestHandler
    {
        public bool CanHandle(Request req)
        {
            return (req.Type == RequestType.SomeVal && req.id > 1000);
        }

        public void Handle(Request req)
        {
            processors.Add(new ProcessLargeRequest(request));
        }
    }

    public class SmallRequestHandler : IRequestHandler
    {
        public bool CanHandle(Request req)
        {
            return (req.Type == RequestType.SomeVal && req.id < 1000);
        }

        public void Handle(Request req)
        {
            processors.Add(new SmallLargeRequest(request));
        }
    }

... similarly keep adding classes for more handlers as you need.

Then create a Chain of these handlers like

public class RequestChain
    {
        IRequestHandler[] handlers;

        public RequestChain()
        {
            handlers = new[] { new LargeRequestHandler(), new SmallRequestHandler() };
        }

        public void ProcessRequest(Request req)
        {
            foreach (var handler in handlers)
            {
                if (handler.CanHandle(req))
                {
                    handler.Handle(req);
                }
            }
        }
    }

Hope this helps. Cheers.

share|improve this answer
1  
Presumably the OP actually wants to do something with the instances that are returned afterwards, most likely on more than one step (i.e. call method X, then method Y). While that's not absolutely clear, CoR limits what you can do quite a bit. –  dotnetnate Aug 7 '11 at 3:34
    
dotnetnate - you're right in your assumption, I do want to do something with the instances, and as such this pattern isn't quite right for me, though it is an interesting one. –  MalcomTucker Aug 7 '11 at 12:26
    
Ideally, I wouldnt new up ProcessLargeRequest and ProcessSmallRequest objects inside the handle method. I would probably constructor or property inject them into my handlers. This would make the code more testable and also you can check the state of your objects after iterating the chain. –  Chamkila Aug 8 '11 at 6:51

A factory is probably the right way to go, but you need a bit more behind it, namely, configuration.

For example, you may want a config file that looks something like

<processor type="typename">
  <rules>
    <rule type="requestIdThresholdRule">
      <configuration evaluationType="ExceedsThreshold" threshold="1000"/>
    </rule>
  </rules>
</processor>
<processor type="othertypename">
  <rules>
    <rule type="yadda">
       <configuration evaluationType="DoesNotMeetThreshold" threshold="1000"/>
    </rule>
  </rules>

This allows you a lot of flexibility for defining which types get created based on the run-time evaluation of the context. You don't have a load of code sitting in the factory method itself, but within a few rules which are mainly driven by configuration values. A lot less code, a lot more flexible.

Then you just call it like:

 List<ISomething> items = ISomethingFactory.CreateISomethingsForContext(context);
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