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In one JS library I saw such syntax:

if (val > 5 == t) { ... }

I tested this in console:

1 == 1 == 2 // false
2 > 1 == 1  // true
1 == 2 == 1 // false
1 == 1 == 1 // true
1 < 2 < 3   // true
1 > 2 > 3   // false

At first glance all correct. Can this be used?

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4  
1 > 2 < 3 // true – Joe Aug 6 '11 at 14:50
    
1 == 2 == 0 is also true. – duri Aug 6 '11 at 14:54
    
not recommended. this will reduce the readability of the code. – Chamika Sandamal Aug 6 '11 at 14:55
    
up vote 7 down vote accepted
1 == 1 == 2  // this
true == 2    // becomes this
1 == 2       // which becomes this, and is false
2 > 1 == 1  // this
true == 1   // becomes this
1 == 1      // which becomes this, and is true

...and so on.

If you're wondering about the conversion, you should do a search on the == operator, which uses the Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm.

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You not really comparing what you think you are comparing:

(1 == 1) == 2 // actually true == 2 which is false

(1 == 2) == 1 // actually false == 1 which is false

Which is why strict equality === will fail in all cases

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It's a correct syntax but not one I would recommend. What's happening, is probably:

if ((val > 5) == t) { ... }

I tested this in console:

(1 == 1) == 2 // false
(2 > 1) == 1  // true
(1 == 2) == 1 // false
(1 == 1) == 1 // true
(1 < 2) < 3   // true
(1 > 2) > 3   // false

With the boolean on the left implicitly converted to an int.

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There is nothing to stop you from using such an adventurous syntax however do keep in mind that one of the most frequent reasons for having bugs inside JavaScript code is messing up operator precedence.

Therefore its strongly advised to explicitly define precedence by adding brackets to precedence groups in case they consist of more than simple mathematical expressions for which the precedence is clearly determinable.

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Another concern is type coercion.
jslint output:

Error: Problem at line 2 character 13: Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.

if (val > 5 == t) { }
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