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I have a header called filepaths.h which defines a number of static variables:

#ifndef FILEPATHS_H
#define FILEPATHS_H

class FilePaths {

public:

    static QString dataFolder();
    static QString profileFolder();

private:

    static QString dataFolder_;
    static QString profileFolder_;

};

}
#endif // FILEPATHS_H

And I have an associated filepaths.cpp which initially looked like this:

#include "FilePaths.h"

QString FilePaths::dataFolder() {
    return dataFolder_;
}

QString FilePaths::profileFolder() {
    return profileFolder_;
}

However that didn't work - I got an "unresolved symbol error" linker error on all the static variables. So I've added these variables to the C++ file in this way:

#include "FilePaths.h"

QString FilePaths::dataFolder_ = "";
QString FilePaths::profileFolder_ = "";

QString FilePaths::dataFolder() {
    return dataFolder_;
}

QString FilePaths::profileFolder() {
    return profileFolder_;
}

And this works, however I don't understand why.

Why do these static variables need to be defined twice? Or maybe I'm not defining them but initializing them? But still why does it need to be done? Or should I write my class differently?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

One is a definition, the other is a declaration. The difference is that declarations can appear multiple times, and for variables not in a class, maybe never at all, whereas definitions can appear once and only once.

The reasons for needing separate declarations and definitions is archaic history, the kind of thing where it basically doesn't have to be that way at all but it is that way so that C++ is compatible with C, which was designed to be compiled in the 1970s.

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3  
I don't think it's that archaic. Declarations say "there exists somewhere a variable/class/function named X" whereas definitions say "X resides here, compiler please allocate storage for it". The ability to separate declarations and definitions is what allows multiple translation units in a statically-typed language without the compiler needing to get overly 'smart' and guess your intentions. – vsekhar Aug 6 '11 at 15:29
    
It's not really archaic, as both standards are (even now, C99/C++11) very vague on the actual linker process, and the definition in a certain cpp file will result in one definition in the resulting object file, if this was not the case, the linker would not find a unique reference when linking all code together. – rubenvb Aug 6 '11 at 15:33
    
vsekhar, @rubenvb: I would note that for template code, we get multiple definitions (in object files) of functions and static attributes, yet the linker manages them right. – Matthieu M. Aug 6 '11 at 15:46
    
The "archaic" part is precisely the build model in which some bits of the program have to be told what exists in other bits of the program. The Java compiler, for example, can go and find out everything it needs to know, and so interfaces can be used according to the programmer's needs, not the compiler's. There are some advantages to C's model. A few of them persist to the present day, although it's questionable whether they're worth the costs. But many of the original advantages had to do with obsolete compile-time resource constraints, and do not persist to the present day. – Steve Jessop Aug 6 '11 at 16:38
2  
It's archaic because the programmer needs to deal with it at all. Pretty much all the other compiled languages don't need this kind of system, and having to repeatedly parse the same declarations over and over again is hideously slow. – Puppy Aug 7 '11 at 13:27

From http://weblogs.asp.net/whaggard/archive/2004/11/05/252685.aspx:

You need to declare it outside the class because otherwise the compiler doesn't know which translation unit (hence object file) the member is supposed to go.

Because, like DeadMG said, you can declare a variable many times but define it only once. I think it's like function prototypes: you can have as many of those as you want, but only one can go with a body and actually define the function.

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You don't declare them twice, the declaration happens in the class header and the definition - the point where the variable is actually there and will allocate some memory - is in the .cpp part.

But the difference to a common instance variable is there, the static part is only there once per class for any instance you create.

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This is because,when ever you declare a class then,you are declaring a structure for the specific instances of that class,BUT in case of static variables in a class,they are the one which can be initialized before any object of the class is created. SEE there is no space reserved when we declare a class in the memory,but the space is reserved when we declare the object of the class.NO member of the class can be initiated like int a=2; but this can be done like 'static int a=2;' is possible in the class declaration reserve space for them on there second declaration,& must be made aware of it

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