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There is a lie that a list in scalar context yields the last element of the list. This is a lie because (as the saying goes) you can't have a list in scalar context. What looks like a list in scalar context is really the comma operator in scalar context and it has different behavior in scalar context.

However, there seems to be a loop hole in this logic: the null list (sometimes called the empty list). The characters () are defined to be the null list by perldoc perlglossary. The construct

my $s = ();

is valid code and returns undef to $s. This does not appear to be documented anywhere in perldoc (I haven't checked the Camel), but lots of code counts on it, so I think it is here to stay.

Now that the preamble is done, here is the question: if we cannot have a list in scalar context, then what do we call the empty list in scalar context and what is the rational for not calling it a list (since there are no commas to be in scalar context)?

If you are enjoying this question, you may also like the discussion going on in P5P.

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Interesting question. Just speculating, so I'm putting this in a comment: are the parentheses in your example really an empty list or are they simply parentheses in this vein: my $x = (4 * 3) + 1;? I ask, because when I trace through the hyperlinks in the perlglossary (empty list > list value > list context), even the empty list appears to hinge upon the existence of list context. –  FMc Aug 6 '11 at 17:29
    
@FMc A valid point. The parentheses in my $s = () might not be an empty list, but a valueless expression (which is null). –  Chas. Owens Aug 6 '11 at 17:32
    
Should it result in an error instead? Odd, yes, but... seems like a sensible enough outcome without terminating the program abruptly. –  user166390 Aug 6 '11 at 17:33
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@pst The trick is that the null list is used a lot in boolean context to mean false. perldoc perlsyn even says "The number 0, the strings '0' and '' , the empty list () , and undef are all false in a boolean context." This is the crux of the problem. perlsyn says you can have an empty list in scalar context, but you can't have a list in scalar context (they don't exist in Perl 5). –  Chas. Owens Aug 6 '11 at 17:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

List is a very generic word. You could possibly be referring to the list operator or to a list value.

There is no comma in the code, so there is no list operator.

There is no list context in the code, so there is no list value.

Therefore, there is no list in

my $s = ();

Parentheses never create a list

(Only indirectly when on the LHS of an assignment operator.)

what do we call the empty list in scalar context

Perl calls it a "stub" (as shown below), and that's truly what it is. It's a placeholder in the code where putting literally nothing would be disallowed.

The stub is represented by "empty parentheses", so that's another name for it.

I call it bad code. If you want to assign undef, assign undef.

There is a lie that a list in scalar context yields the last element of the list.

No, that's true. List values cannot exist in scalar context, so that leaves the list operator.

The list operator aka the comma operator returns the last element of the list in scalar context.


Compare the following. No mention of list:

>perl -MO=Concise -e"my $s = ();"
6  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->3
5     <2> sassign vKS/2 ->6
3        <0> stub sP ->4
4        <0> padsv[$s:1,2] sRM*/LVINTRO ->5
-e syntax OK

There is a mention of a list

>perl -MO=Concise -e"my @a = ();"
7  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->3
6     <2> aassign[t2] vKS ->7
-        <1> ex-list lK ->4
3           <0> pushmark s ->4
-           <0> stub lP ->-
-        <1> ex-list lK ->6
4           <0> pushmark s ->5
5           <0> padav[@a:1,2] lRM*/LVINTRO ->6
-e syntax OK

...and it has nothing to do with the parens

>perl -MO=Concise -e"my @a = 's';"
8  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->3
7     <2> aassign[t2] vKS ->8
-        <1> ex-list lK ->5
3           <0> pushmark s ->4
4           <$> const[PV "s"] s ->5
-        <1> ex-list lK ->7
5           <0> pushmark s ->6
6           <0> padav[@a:1,2] lRM*/LVINTRO ->7
-e syntax OK
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I think you are misusing the term list operator. It isn't bad code (well $s = () probably is, but if ( f() ) where f returns a null list is standard practice). The lie is that a list can ever be in list context (it can't because there is no such beast in Perl 5), not that it yields the last item. perl may call it a stub, but Perl calls it the null list or the empty list. Interestingly, in the second example () is still a stub, not a list (the stub is a (non-)value in the list). perl -MO=Concise -e '((),5,())' is also interesting. –  Chas. Owens Aug 7 '11 at 10:39
    
@Chas. Owens, Re "The lie is that a list can ever be in list context", No it's not. The list op (aka comma op) can definitely be used in scalar context. It just won't return a list. Do ` perl -MO=Concise -e "scalar('a','b')"` and you'll see list s. The "s" is for "scalar". –  ikegami Aug 7 '11 at 19:07
    
@Chas. Owens, As for if (f()), that seems really wrong too. If f is returning (), that means it can return undef as a "true" value. if (f()) should be if (() = f()) or f() shouldn't be returning (). Again, bad code. –  ikegami Aug 7 '11 at 19:10
    
@Chas. Owens, Re "I think you are misusing the term list operator", I'm referring to the list operator, not this slang for operators that process arbitrary lists. See perlop. –  ikegami Aug 7 '11 at 19:19
    
Reread perlop yourself, the comma operator is the comma operator (it is never referred to as the list operator). There is no "the list operator". List operator is the technical term for an n-ary function call that does not use parentheses. –  Chas. Owens Aug 8 '11 at 1:02

It's more like a valueless expression which is equivalent to undef. Some more examples:

$ perl -we 'print scalar( () )'
Use of uninitialized value in print at -e line 1.

$ perl -we 'print 0+()'
Use of uninitialized value in addition (+) at -e line 1.
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FMc made this point in the comments, and it is compelling. I guess I should splunk into the internals to figure out what the perl thinks is going on. –  Chas. Owens Aug 6 '11 at 22:23
    
@Chas. Owens, it creates a stub operator (but no list operator). See my answer. –  ikegami Aug 7 '11 at 5:12

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