Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm reading the docs at http://nodejs.org/docs/v0.4.0/api/http.html#http.request, but for some reason, I can't seem to to actually find the body/data attribute on the returned, finished response object.

coffee> res = http.get({host:'www.somesite.com',path:'/'})

coffee> res.finished
true

coffee> res._hasBody
true

It's finished (http.get does that for you), so it should have some kind of content. But there's no body, no data, and I can't read from it. Where is the body hiding?

share|improve this question
7  
Since none of the answers mention how you'll know when the data events are done.. have your res listen for "end" (nodejs.org/docs/latest/api/http.html#event_end_) –  SooDesuNe Mar 2 '12 at 20:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 53 down vote accepted

http.request docs contains example how to receive body of the response through handling data event:

var options = {
  host: 'www.google.com',
  port: 80,
  path: '/upload',
  method: 'POST'
};

var req = http.request(options, function(res) {
  console.log('STATUS: ' + res.statusCode);
  console.log('HEADERS: ' + JSON.stringify(res.headers));
  res.setEncoding('utf8');
  res.on('data', function (chunk) {
    console.log('BODY: ' + chunk);
  });
});

req.on('error', function(e) {
  console.log('problem with request: ' + e.message);
});

// write data to request body
req.write('data\n');
req.write('data\n');
req.end();

http.get does the same thing as http.request except it calls req.end() automatically.

var options = {
  host: 'www.google.com',
  port: 80,
  path: '/index.html'
};

http.get(options, function(res) {
  console.log("Got response: " + res.statusCode);

  res.on("data", function(chunk) {
    console.log("BODY: " + chunk);
  });
}).on('error', function(e) {
  console.log("Got error: " + e.message);
});
share|improve this answer
4  
For some reason, I had to add res.setEncoding('utf8'); to the http.get example. Otherwise I didn't get HTML in the chunk variable. –  SSH This Nov 28 '13 at 2:21
    
@SSHThis that's because they were Buffer objects containing raw data. If you wanted strings from them you could also use chunk.toString(), optionally passing toString and encoding. That said, setEncoding is likely more efficient. –  skeggse Dec 17 '13 at 19:13

http.get() returns a request object, not a response object (unlike other synchronous libraries you may be used to).

The request, being a request, does not contain the response body, so I was looking in the wrong place.

To do something once that request has received a response, create callbacks:

  • One for when the response is first recieved
  • Another, inside the request, for when data is recieved (which may be a while after the headers have come through)

Working code as follows:

http = require('http')

options =
  host: 'www.sfsdffsd.com'
  path: '/'

request = http.get options, (response) ->
  console.log("Got response: " + response.statusCode)
  console.log(response.headers)
  console.dir(response)  
  response.on 'data', (chunk) -> 
    console.log('body: ' + chunk)

request.on 'error', (error) ->
  console.log("Got error: " + error.message)
share|improve this answer

I also want to add that the http.ClientResponse returned by http.get() has an end event, so here is another way that I receive the body response:

var options = {
  host: 'www.google.com',
  port: 80,
  path: '/index.html'
};

http.get(options, function(res) {
  var body = '';
  res.on('data', function(chunk) {
    body += chunk;
  });
  res.on('end', function() {
    console.log(body);
  });
}).on('error', function(e) {
  console.log("Got error: " + e.message);
}); 
share|improve this answer

You need to add a listener to the request because node.js works asynchronous like that:

request.on('response', function (response) {
  response.on('data', function (chunk) {
    console.log('BODY: ' + chunk);
 });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Could you show an example using http.get? –  mikemaccana Aug 6 '11 at 17:41

If you want to use .get you can do it like this

http.get(url, function(res){
    res.setEncoding('utf8');
    res.on('data', function(chunk){
        console.log(chunk);
    });

});
share|improve this answer
2  
The other examples gave me what looked like hex values when I didn't included text with the chunk response. Setting the encoding displayed the JSON document I was looking for. Thank you! –  Collin McGuire Dec 11 '13 at 6:50
    
@CollinMcGuire that's because they were Buffer objects containing raw data. If you wanted strings from them you could also use chunk.toString(), optionally passing toString and encoding. That said, setEncoding is likely more efficient. –  skeggse Dec 17 '13 at 19:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.