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I'm having some problems attempting to create a multi-threaded Server. Everything works fine until I need to remove a client from the server.

The server is run in it's own thread, then each client has it's own thread as well.

I'm using boost::thread for all the threads. When I need to stop the client I call

void StopClient()
{
    assert(mThread);

    mStopMutex.lock();
    mStopRequested = true;
    mStopMutex.unlock();

    shutdown(mSocket,2);

    mThread->join();
}

Adding a breakpoint to the line

shutdown(mSocket,2);

I can see that mThread doesn't exist! Does this mean that the thread has already exited? Do you always need to call join() for a boost::thread?

If I allow the code to run I get an access violation error.

Update

ServerThread

void StartServer() 
{
    assert(!mListenThread);
    mListenThread = boost::shared_ptr<boost::thread>(new boost::thread(boost::bind(&ServerThread::Listen, this)));
    mUpdateThread = boost::shared_ptr<boost::thread>(new boost::thread(boost::bind(&ServerThread::Update, this)));
}

void StopServer()
{
    assert(mListenThread);
    mStopRequested = true;

            mMutex.lock();
            for(int i = 0; i < mClients.size(); i++ )
                mClients[i]->StopClient();
            mMutex.unlock();

    mListenThread->join();
}

void Listen()
{
    while (!mStopRequested)
    {
        std::cout << "Waiting for connection" << std::endl;         
        if(mClientSocket = accept( mServerSocket, (sockaddr*) &mServerAddr, &addrlen ) )
        {
            mMutex.lock();
            if( mClients.size() > 0 )
            {
                for( int i = 0; i < mClients.size(); i++ )
                {
                    if( mClients[i]->getClientSocket() != mClientSocket )
                    {
                        ClientThread newClient;
                        newClient.Initialise(mClientSocket);
                        mClients.push_back(&newClient);
                        mClients[mClients.size()-1]->StartClient();
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
            else
            {
                ClientThread newClient;
                newClient.Initialise(mClientSocket);
                mClients.push_back(&newClient);
                mClients[mClients.size()-1]->StartClient();
            }
            mMutex.unlock();
        }
    }
}          

void Update()
{
    while (!mStopRequested)
    {
        mMutex.lock();

        std::cout << "::::Server is updating!::::" << mClients.size() << std::endl;
        for( int i = 0; i< mClients.size(); i++ )
        {
            if( !mClients[i]->IsActive() )
            {
                mClients[i]->StopClient();
                mClients.erase( mClients.begin() + i );
            }
        }

        mMutex.unlock();

    }
}

ClientThread

void StartClient()
{
    assert(!mThread);
    mThread = boost::shared_ptr<boost::thread>(new boost::thread(boost::bind(&ClientThread::Update, this)));
}

void Update()
{
    bool stopRequested;
    do
    {
        mStopMutex.lock();
        stopRequested = mStopRequested;
        mStopMutex.unlock();

        std::cout << "lol" << std::endl;
        if( mTimeOut < 1000 )
        {
            mTimeOut++;
        }
        else
        {
            mActive = false;
        }

        boost::this_thread::interruption_point();
    }
    while( !stopRequested);
}
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4  
You need to show us more code than that. Where is mThread set, and to what value? Where else is it used? –  Chris Jester-Young Aug 6 '11 at 18:05
1  
What do you mean with "mThread doesn't exist"? Is it NULL or does it point to a deleted object? –  Rüdiger Stevens Aug 6 '11 at 22:29
    
Thanks for the replies. I've updated to show some more code! @Rüdiger it just points to a deleted object. –  kiwijus Aug 7 '11 at 8:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
            ClientThread newClient;
            newClient.Initialise(mClientSocket);
            mClients.push_back(&newClient);

This creates a local variable on the stack, and puts the address of it into your list of mClients. Then the scope ends, and so does the local variable. This leaves your list mClients pointing at something that's not there anymore.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a good point! I've changed the code to ClientThread* newClient = new ClientThread(); newClient->Initialise(mClientSocket); mClients.push_back(newClient); and now it works! :) Thanks! –  kiwijus Aug 7 '11 at 9:04

There's not enough code here to determine exactly what's going on, but here are things to check:

  • You likely have a processing loop within your client thread that is checking the mStopRequested member. Before the processing loop exits, is it changing the mThread member?
  • Is mThread NULL when you get the access violation? Or, is it some other value? Is it valid before setting mStopRequested to true?
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