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Using Mathematica, I have a list:

l={0,0,0,1,2,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,2,0,0,0}

I want to apply a function to the above list to obtain the following:

{0,0,0,1,2,2,2,2,1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2}

Essentially I want to replace the runs of 0 values with runs of the same length, but using the value of the positive integer just preceding each run of 0s.

I thought I could do this easily with FoldList, but I can't see my way through to a solution.

Many thanks.

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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here is your test list:

tst = {0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0}

The following solution will be reasonably efficient:

In[31]:= Module[{n = 0}, Replace[tst, {0 :> n, x_ :> (n = x)}, {1}]]

Out[31]= {0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2}

The way it works is the following: we use the fact that only the first matching rule is applied. The variable n stores the last non-zero value encountered by the pattern-matcher during its run through the list. Initially it is set to zero. The first rule replaces 0 with the current value of n. If it matches, replacement is made and the pattern-matcher goes on. If it does not match, then we have a non-zero value and the second rule applies, updating the value of n. Since the Set assignment returns back the value, the non-zero element is simply placed back. The solution should have a linear complexity in the length of the list, and is IMO a good example of the occasional utility of side effects mixed with rules.

EDIT

Here is a functional version:

In[56]:= Module[{n = 0}, Map[If[# != 0, n = #, n] &, tst]]

Out[56]= {0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2}

One can check that the rule - based version is about 4 times faster for really large lists. However, the advantage of this form is that it can easily be Compile-d, providing extreme performance:

nzrunsC = 
 Compile[{{l, _Integer, 1}}, 
   Module[{n = 0}, Map[If[# != 0, n = #, n] &, l]], 
   CompilationTarget -> "C"]

In[68]:= tstLarge = RandomInteger[{0,2},{10000000}];

In[69]:= nzrunsC[tstLarge];//Timing
Out[69]= {0.047,Null}

In[70]:= Module[{n = 0},Map[If[#!=0,n = #,n]&,tstLarge]];//Timing
Out[70]= {18.203,Null}

The difference is several hundred times here, and about a hundred times faster than the rule-based solution. OTOH, rule-based solution will work also with symbolic lists, not necessarily integer lists.

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Would you explain your solution? I see that it works, but I'm not certain I understand {0 :> n, x_ :> (n = x)}, {1}] –  David Carraher Aug 6 '11 at 21:42
    
@Leonid This would also overwrite zero runs of length 1. I am not sure the OP considers them as such. –  Sasha Aug 6 '11 at 21:46
1  
@David - please see the update, I added an explanation. You could use ReplaceAll as well, but then you'd have to use {0 :> n, x_Integer :> (n = x)} (otherwise x_ would match the entire list, since ReplaceAll works from expressions to their parts), which would slightly degrade the performance. –  Leonid Shifrin Aug 6 '11 at 21:52
1  
@Sasha I don't see anything in the question that would suggest runs of length 1 being exempted from replacement. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Aug 6 '11 at 21:58
1  
@Sjoerd Of course this solution is just a thin rule-based layer on top of a procedural loop - I was just using Replace as a short-cut for For, plus don't have to preallocate the result, but the solution is still more procedural than rule-based by nature. But it is shorter and looks neater :) –  Leonid Shifrin Aug 6 '11 at 22:08
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ReplaceRepeated seems to work fine for this:

l //. {f__, x_ /; x != 0, 0, e___} :> {f, x, x, e}

(*   {0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2}  *)
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@recollyer Hmm. Works for me. I checked the code to see if if was perhaps pasted incorrectly. But no. It is exactly what I ran. And the output is exactly what I got! –  David Carraher Aug 6 '11 at 21:31
1  
@Leonid You're absolutely correct about performance. BTW, for a "random" list of ten thousand 0,1,2's, my routine took 1.25s. Yours took .0067s. –  David Carraher Aug 6 '11 at 21:40
2  
//. isn't ReplaceAll, it's ReplaceRepeated. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Aug 6 '11 at 22:01
2  
@LeonidShifrin You should certainly publish it through a publisher this time. I know I'd buy it and you deserve the royalties :) –  Lorem Ipsum Aug 7 '11 at 12:21
1  
@Leonid Some contributions, such as your comments on SO might stand alone as Sidebars. You wouldn't have to work them into the text. –  David Carraher Aug 7 '11 at 15:22
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Your original idea of using FoldList results in the following elegant solution:

In[1]:= tst = {0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0};

In[2]:= FoldList[If[#2 != 0, #2, #1] &, 0, tst] // Rest                 

Out[2]= {0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2}

This solution is functionally purer because it does not require a helper variable to be set as a side effect, as the rule-based or map-based versions do. It's also faster:

In[3]:= tstLarge = RandomInteger[{0, 2}, {10000000}];

In[4]:= Module[{n = 0}, Replace[tstLarge, {0 :> n, x_ :> (n = x)}, {1}]]; // Timing

Out[4]= {5.704, Null}

In[5]:= Module[{n = 0}, Map[If[# != 0, n = #, n] &, tstLarge]]; // Timing

Out[5]= {16.5619, Null}

In[6]:= FoldList[If[#2 != 0, #2, #1] &, 0, tstLarge] // Rest; // Timing

Out[6]= {1.25148, Null}
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Nice solution! +1 –  Leonid Shifrin Aug 7 '11 at 12:58
    
Interesting how it works. +1 –  David Carraher Aug 7 '11 at 15:24
    
@sakra -- Very cool indeed! –  Jagra Aug 7 '11 at 22:06
2  
+1 This can be made more terse using: If[#2 == 0, ##] & –  Mr.Wizard Aug 16 '11 at 15:56
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