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How can I properly use jQuery and CoffeeScript? All of the examples that I have seen thus far compile the CofeeScript at runtime in the browser; this is not ideal. Normally, I'd simply write in plain old JavaScript, but I think CoffeeScript can allow me do get more done with less code, once I know how to get started. I've worked with JQuery before, but I've not used CoffeeScript. I'm not sure where to get started? Should I place $(document).ready in my external CofeeScript/Javascript?

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up vote 15 down vote accepted

Just have to put the jquery code after $ ->

Here is a small article about it, and if you are starting The Little Book on CoffeeScript is quite useful, it's very clear and goes from scratch

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As it turns out, $ -> is also a smiley, representing the expression on javascript programmers' faces after they find out how easy coffeescript function definitions are. –  Josh Feb 21 '13 at 21:09
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All of the examples that I have seen thus far compile the CoffeeScript at runtime in the browser; this is not ideal.

Agreed. You should look at projects like The Middleman that let you transparently compile your CoffeeScript to JavaScript on a local server for development, then bundle up the minified JS for deployment. (The Middleman also includes support for Haml and Sass, if you're into those, but you can just use HTML and CSS as well.)

The big advantage of The Middleman (or Rails, or any other web framework with CoffeeScript support) over just running coffee -cw is that the latest version of your compiled CoffeeScript is served every time you refresh the page; you never have to worry about waiting for background compilation to finish.

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