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open (FH,"report");
read(FH,$text,-s "report");

$fill{"place"} = "Dhahran";
$fill{"wdesc:desc"} = "hot";
$fill{"dayno.days"} = 4;

$text =~ s/%(\w+)%/$fill{$1}/g;

print $text;

This is the content of the "report" template file

"I am giving a course this week in %place%. The weather is %wdesc:desc%
and we're now onto day no %dayno.days%. It's great group of blokes on the
course but the room is like the weather - %wdesc:desc% and it gets hard to
follow late in the day."

For reasons that I won't go into, some of the keys in the hash I'll be using will have dots (.) or colons (:) in them, but the regex stops working for these, so for instance in the example above only %place% gets correctly replaced. By the way, my code is based on this example.

Any help with the regex greatly appreciated, or maybe there's a better approach...

share|improve this question
    
Of course it doesn't work with dots and colons. You're only capturing a string of word characters, which they are not. (\w+(?:[.:]\w+)*) is a better expression, and if you're only ever expecting one dot or colon (at most): (\w+(?:[.:]\w+)?). (?:...) means it's not a capture group. –  Axeman Aug 7 '11 at 23:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Good answers so far, but you should also decide what you want to do with %foo% if foo isn't a key in the %fill hash. Plausible options are:

  • Replace it with an empty string (that's what the current solutions do, since undef is treated as an empty string in this context)
  • Leave it alone, so "%foo%" stays as it is.
  • Do some kind of error handling, perhaps printing a warning on STDERR, terminating the translation, or inserting an error indicator into the text.

Some other observations, not directly relevant to your question:

  • You should use the three-argument version of open.
  • That's not the cleanest way to read an entire file into a string. For that matter, for what you're doing you might as well process the input one line at a time.

Here's how I might do it (this version leaves unrecognized "%foo%" strings alone):

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my %fill = ( place        => 'Dhahran',
             'wdesc:desc' => 'hot',
             'dayno.days' => 4 );

my $filename = 'report';

open my $FH,,'<', $filename or die "$filename: $!\n";
while (my $line = <$FH>) {
    foreach my $key (keys %fill) {
        $line =~ s/\Q%$key%/$fill{$key}/g;
    }
    print $line;
}

And here's a version that dies with an error message if there's an unrecognized key:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my %fill = ( place        => 'Dhahran',
             'wdesc:desc' => 'hot',
             'dayno.days' => 4 );

my $filename = 'report';

open my $FH,,'<', $filename or die "$filename: $!\n";
while (my $line = <$FH>) {
    $line =~ s/%([^%]*)%/Replacement($1)/eg;
    print $line;
}

sub Replacement {
    my($key) = @_;
    if (exists $fill{$key}) {
        return $fill{$key};
    }
    else {
        die "Unrecognized key \"$key\" on line $.\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
/%([^%]*)%/Replacement(\%fill, $1)/eg would be even better. –  mu is too short Aug 7 '11 at 0:00
1  
[^%\s] would be best, as it'd avoid unnecessary borking when the text uses % without the special meaning. –  Chris Lutz Aug 7 '11 at 0:13
1  
@Chris: If you have to worry about that (which is a good idea) then moving to a better delimiter would be advised, something like !!...!! or {{...}}. And if you need to allow that stuff through then apply true laziness (rather than false laziness) and switch to Template Toolkit. –  mu is too short Aug 7 '11 at 0:22
    
@Keith Ah yes of course unrecognised %foo% behaviour! Good point. I'm going with your initial example. cheers for the other tips also. Ta. –  Monte Aug 7 '11 at 12:43
1  
You could avoid looping and testing each variable against a separate regex with my $regex = join("|", map quotemeta, keys %fill); s/%($regex)%/$fill{$1}/g; –  Chris Lutz Aug 7 '11 at 17:37

You could loosen it right up and use "any sequence of anything that isn't a %" for the replaceable tokens:

$text =~ s/%([^%]+)%/$fill{$1}/g;
share|improve this answer
    
that'll work, but it might open it up to some further complications –  vol7ron Aug 6 '11 at 23:50
1  
Yeah, OP might want to add an \s in there too, [^%\s]. –  Qtax Aug 7 '11 at 0:06
    
Much better would be [^\s%], anything not a % or whitespace. –  Chris Lutz Aug 7 '11 at 0:07
1  
@Qtax, @Chris: Better would be a full specification of what can be in the tokens. Based on the examples it is probably [a-z.:] but maybe more. Using [\w\s.:]+ and then adding some whitespace stripping (to allow things like %pan\ncakes%) to Keith's Replacement approach would be the best. –  mu is too short Aug 7 '11 at 0:15
    
Thanks all, really good suggestions. I'm going with one of Keith's since I need the unrecognised %foo% strings to remain untouched. –  Monte Aug 7 '11 at 12:38

http://codepad.org/G0WEDNyH

$text =~ s/%([a-zA-Z0-9_\.\:]+)%/$fill{$1}/g;



    By default \w equates to [a-zA-Z0-9_], so you'll need to add in the \. and \:.



share|improve this answer
    
You can use \w (and related shortcuts) inside a character class and you don't need to escape the . inside a character class. Just %([\w:.]+)% would suffice and be less noisy. –  mu is too short Aug 7 '11 at 0:04
    
I was going to do the same thing, but call me old-fashioned, I like being more explicit. I think newer versions of Perl have /a, which \w does more than a-zA-Z0-9_, I just don't remember what the additionals are - they might be unicode equivalents –  vol7ron Aug 7 '11 at 0:08

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