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I am having a python .so file which works fine with python v2.4.3 , but I dont have the source code of that library file. Now It fails to work in python 2.6.5. Is it possible to open the .so file and recompile it in python 2.6.5 ?? I dont know whether it is possible, I am just curious . Thanks !

The error I get

Traceback (most recent call last):

File "run.py", line 1, in

import MarkovPrediction

File "/home/ssubbiah/markov_prediction/vmresource/MarkovPrediction.py", line 7, in

import libmarkov

ImportError: /home/ssubbiah/markov_prediction/vmresource/libmarkov.so: undefined symbol: _ZN5boost6python9converter8registry6insertEPFPvP7_objectEPFvS5_PNS1_30rvalue_from_python_stage1_dataEENS0_9type_infoE

  • Sethu
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No way to tell without the source code. Where'd you get it from? –  Rafe Kettler Aug 7 '11 at 0:41
    
It is a code that was maintained for a long time which performs markov prediction. The one who wrote the code left our team and the source code is lost :( –  sethu Aug 7 '11 at 0:51
    
I couldnt import it : –  sethu Aug 7 '11 at 1:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Extension modules need to be compiled for a specific version of Python. Without the source code, no, you can't use it for a different version.

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I am accepting both the answers provided. I knew that I wont be able to use it. But I was just curious whether there is some corner case or small hack that would let me do it !! –  sethu Aug 7 '11 at 16:19

A .so file (.pyd on Windows) is a module which was written in C. It's compiled for, and tied to, a specific version of Python, in this case Python 2.4.x.

If you want it to work with a different version of Python, you'll need to re-compile the original source code for that version.

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