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Is it possible in C# to use UTF-32 characters not in Plane 0 as a char?

string s = ""; // valid
char c = ''; // generates a compiler error ("Too many characters in character literal")

And in s it is represented by two characters, not one.

Edit: I mean, is there a character AN string type with full unicode support, UTF-32 or UTF-8 per character? For example if I want a for loop on utf-32 (maybe not in plane0) characters in a string.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The string class represents a UTF-16 encoded block of text, and each char in a string represents a UTF-16 code value.

Although there is no BCL type that represents a single Unicode code point, there is support for Unicode characters beyond Plane 0 in the form of method overloads taking a string and an index instead of just a char. For example, the static GetUnicodeCategory(char) method on the System.Globalization.CharUnicodeInfo class has a corresponding GetUnicodeCategory(string,int) method that will recognize a simple character or a surrogate pair starting at the specified index.


To iterate through the text elements in a string, you can use the methods on the System.Globalization.StringInfo class. Here, a "text element" corresponds to a single character as displayed on screen. This means that simple characters ("a"), combining characters ("a\u0304\u0308" = "ā̈"), and surrogate pairs ("\uD950\uDF21" = "��") will all be treated as a single text element.

Specifically, the GetTextElementEnumerator static method will allow you to enumerate over each text element in a string (see the linked MSDN page for a code example).

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I only know this problem from Java and checked the documentation on char before answering and indeed the behavior is pretty much the same in .NET/C# and Java.

It seems that indeed a char is defined to be 16 bit and definitely can't hold anything outside of Plane 0. Only String/string is capable of handling those characters. In a char-array it will be represented as two surrogate characters.

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C# System.String support UTF-32 just fine, but you can't iterate through the string like it is an array of System.Char or use IEnumerable.

for example:

// iterating through a string NO UTF-32 SUPPORT
for (int i = 0; i < sample.Length; ++i)
{
    if (Char.IsDigit(sample[i]))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("IsDigit");
    }
    else if (Char.IsLetter(sample[i]))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("IsLetter");
    }
}

// iterating through a string WITH UTF-32 SUPPORT
for (int i = 0; i < sample.Length; ++i)
{
    if (Char.IsDigit(sample, i))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("IsDigit");
    }
    else if (Char.IsLetter(sample, i))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("IsLetter");
    }

    if (Char.IsSurrogate(sample, i))
    {
        ++i;
    }
}

Note the subtle difference in the Char.IsDigit and Char.IsLetter calls. And that String.Length is always the number of 16-bit "characters", not the number of "characters" in the UTF-32 sense.

Off topic, but UTF-32 support is completely unnecessary for an application to handle international languages, unless you have a specific business case for an obscure historical/technical language.

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What you're talking about is not UTF-32, it's just UTF-16 that happens to contain supplemental characters. In UTF-32, every character is stored as four bytes. .NET strings are always UTF-16. –  Alan Moore May 9 '09 at 19:59
    
Instead of "with UTF-32 support", the example should probably read "with surrogate pair support" or "with support for actual characters, not just 16-bit chunks of I-hope-this-char-is-in-the-BMP". –  Triynko Apr 13 '11 at 23:00

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