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I'm having trouble understanding callbacks in javascript. I've searched through stack overflow but haven't been able to clear up one of my questions:

Callbacks are meant to handle asynchronous events, like a request of a server. A book i have has this example:

request = prepare_request();
send_request(request,function(response) {
    display(response);
    });
  1. how is this a callback?
  2. the response parameter hasn't been defined, so how can it be called by send_request()?
  3. if callbacks are meant to be called asynchronously, they must be conditional right? so they should always appear with an if statement?

Any help would be great.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Callbacks are simply functions. They don't have to be asynchronous, though they usually are.

When a function is defined, it can list the parameters it expects to receive. The response argument is an example of that. It says that when the callback function is invoked, the first parameter will be assigned to the variable response.

Callbacks are orthogonal to conditional statements. Although the receiver could conditionally invoke a callback, they don't necessarily have to be conditional.

Here's a lame example of a callback which is synchronous and clearly does not have anything do to with conditionals,

function greetPerson(name, greeter) {
    greeter(name);
}

greetPerson("John", function(person) { alert("Hello " + person); });
greetPerson("Nancy", function(person) { console.log("Whats up " + person); });

It may seem ridiculous but this is a demonstration of callback functions. A callback is just a function that you pass to some other function, and that other function will call back this passed function at some point in the future.

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I liked your explanation better than mine :) –  Kris Aug 7 '11 at 3:58
  1. It's a callback but you're creating the callback method when the send_request method is called. This method will be called when the server returns. If you use something like Firebug you'll see that, when stepping through the code, the function inside of send_request will get highlighted but it won't be called until the server returns.

  2. It's a parameter for the function meaning when the callback is called, something will pass that variable into the method.

Basically, you're doing this except you moved the callback function's definition into the same method that requires it:

MyCallback = function (response) {
     display(response);
};

request = prepare_request();
send_request(request, MyCallback);
  1. I'm not sure I follow you. Typically you'll have a success and a failure callback. Success should always be called if the method (typically AJAX) returns successfully. Failure is the same way but, obviously, when something fails.

If you have one callback method then it makes sense to try and check to see if it failed or not.

I hope that makes sense!

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Let's expand that example:

request = prepare_request();
send_request(request,function(response) {
    display(response);
});

function send_request(request, callback) {
  // do stuff here to obtain a response
  callback(response); //execute the callback passing the response
}

As you can see there's no need for a conditional. Also the response has not been created when you define the callback, but the callback does know what to do once it's available, it's like saying "hey once foo arrives, do this and that".

Lastly, to your first question, I think you're having problems with seeing the callback as an anonymous function. This doesn't have to be that way, it's also possible to do:

var callback = function(response) {
    display(response);
}
send_request(request, callback);

or

function callback(response){
  display(response);
}

send_request(request, callback);
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Callback is a piece of code that needs to execute when something is done. Think of them as notification or event notifications (c#, java parlance).

Often times they are used in checking Ajax responses but there is nothing asynchronous about them.

A simple example is Obvserver/Subscriber pattern. I'm letting you know to notify me back when something is done on your side. This is achieved by me sending you the function handle (could be inline or could be a handle to existing function).

Examples:

Wish I was fast enough to type in @Pablo's excellent examples.

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A callback is a way to define what should happen at some undefined later point in time. In your AJAX example, the script will make a call to a server. This request may take some time to complete. It may not complete at all. But if and when the request completes, you want to execute some code that does something with the response. And if possible, you don't want to make your program wait until then, but execute the AJAX request asynchronously.

So, the function that executes the AJAX request allows you to specify a callback function. That simply means "if and when the request succeeds, I'll call this function (back)". In your case, that function is defined inline. You could also just pass the name of any other function that is defined like a normal named function, which might make this easier to understand. You're just saying "after the request is done, please execute this function."

As the first parameter to this function, the result of the AJAX request is passed. That's why your callback function defines a response parameter.

Hope that helps.

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