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In writing an install script, I quickly found that I'd have cross-platform issues, and bash scripts are hard to maintain. I decided to look for a cleaner solution that's more cross-platform.

The goal is to have an intelligent script sniff out components of the user's system and have as little user interaction as possible. That being stated, I thought about these languages:

  • Python- cross-platform, and many other programs rely on it, so it may already be present
  • Javascript- nodejs is required by part of my application, but it's a little clunky for exec calls

Are there any languages that would be a better fit for this application?

Requirements:

  • Available on all platforms
    • May be distributed as part of my application if small enough
    • Little to no version variation, so Ruby is out
    • *nix only for now, but eventually will be run on Windows
  • Maintainable
    • Clear syntax (Perl is out)
    • Modular (if I sniff the OS, I can include separate OS-specific code)
  • Capable of downloading files (unmet dependencies)
  • Capable of relatively complex scripting tasks
    • Testing for used HTTP ports
    • Reading and parsing files for configuration data
    • Checking for permissions and changing directories of insufficient privileges
  • Open source
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Python can do all of those things:

  • Available on all platforms (Mac, Linux, Windows, and more)
    • May be distributed as part of my application if small enough (You can make binaries with cx_freeze, if needed)
    • Little to no version variation, so Ruby is out (Python is pretty static when it comes to version changes)
    • *nix only for now, but eventually will be run on Windows (It comes pre-installed on Mac, and ships with just about any Linux distro. Binaries don't need the interpreter to run)
  • Maintainable
    • Clear syntax (Perl is out) (Python is very easy to read, but that's up to you to decide)
    • Modular (if I sniff the OS, I can include separate OS-specific code) (Modules are just files in Python)
  • Capable of downloading files (unmet dependencies) (Urllib2 takes care of that, and it's pre-installed)
  • Open source (Yep)
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I just started learning Python earlier this week. How simple is it to call native command-line applications (grep, sed, cat, etc)? –  tjameson Aug 7 '11 at 5:11
    
It's a bit hard to capture output of commands (not hard, but more than one line of code), so Python has most of those commands implemented one way or another. cat would be open('file.txt', 'r').read(). You'll find it awkward that it's not as easy as you'd like to call system commands (it's just import os and os.system('foo'), btw), but in the long run, native solutions are a lot easier to work with. TL;DR: you'll pick that stuff up as you learn more about Python –  Blender Aug 7 '11 at 5:20
    
Ironically, the reason I considered Python in the first place is because I started some work in Blender. Thanks for all the help! –  tjameson Aug 7 '11 at 5:24
    
Me too ;) It's a nice language, but I never really used it for Blender much. Maybe once for a 3D plotter, but that's about it. You'll love the way it doesn't break when you switch data types. –  Blender Aug 7 '11 at 5:29
    
Like Javascript. It's nice to be able to assign stuff to a variable, instead of having to worry about types. I think Python my be the tool for the job, but I'll leave this open for a little bit just in case someone comes out with something better. –  tjameson Aug 7 '11 at 5:33

Ant will do what you need. It is OS independent and will allow compiles and installs.

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I'm not too familiar with it. Does it allow relatively complex scripting (like downloading stuff from the web, scanning for HTTP ports, generating files based on user input)? –  tjameson Aug 7 '11 at 5:07

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