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I was testing out covariant return types and came across this problem.

class Vehicle {

    int i = 3;
}
class Car extends Vehicle{

    int i = 5;

    public Car returningCar(){
        System.out.println("Returning Car");
        return new Car();
    }

    public Vehicle returningCarInVehicle(){
        System.out.println("Returning CarInVehicle");
        return new Car();
    }
}

public class ScjpTest{

    public static void main(String[] args){

        Car car = new Car();
        Vehicle vehicleCar = car.returningCar();
        Vehicle vehicleCar2 = car.returningCarInVehicle();

        System.out.println("vehicleCar " + vehicleCar.i);
        System.out.println("vehicleCar2 " + vehicleCar2.i);

    }
}

The output to the above is Returning Car

   Returning 
   CarInVehicle
   vehicleCar 3
   vehicleCar2 3

I dont understand why the output is 3. I was expecting the output to be 5 in both instances because at runtime the JVM uses the actual object not the reference.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
What does it have to do with covariant return types? –  JB Nizet Aug 7 '11 at 9:50
    
I just discover something about Java. In other programming languages "int i = 5;" would be marked as "duplicated" identifier. –  umlcat May 17 '12 at 1:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Fields aren't virtual/overrideable/etc. They will be resolved according to the compile-time type of the reference, which in this case is Vehicle.

This code would print "vehicleCar2 5":

System.out.println("vehicleCar2 " + ((Car)vehicleCar2).i);

since the cast makes the expression of compile-time type Car.

share|improve this answer
    
So fields are never overriden then? –  ziggy Aug 7 '11 at 9:50
    
@ziggy Right. They can be effectively hidden, but never overridden. –  dlev Aug 7 '11 at 9:51
    
ok many thanks. –  ziggy Aug 7 '11 at 9:53
    
I discovered a similar situation recently with static methods. I guess fields are also treated the same as static methods when overriding is involved. –  ziggy Aug 7 '11 at 10:11
    
@Ziggy Yeah, static methods are also not available for overriding. –  dlev Aug 7 '11 at 15:34

You need to use methods to get the polymorphic behaviour you're after (it's also a best practice to encapsulate member variables by making them private and providing public setter and getter methods)

    class Vehicle {

        private int i = 3;

        protected Vehicle(int i) {
            this.i = i;
        }

        public int i() {
            return i;
        }
    }
    class Car extends Vehicle{

        public Car() { 
            super (5);
        }

        public Car returningCar(){
            System.out.println("Returning Car");
            return new Car();
        }

        public Vehicle returningCarInVehicle(){
            System.out.println("Returning CarInVehicle");
            return new Car();
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){

        Car car = new Car();
        Vehicle vehicleCar = car.returningCar();
        Vehicle vehicleCar2 = car.returningCarInVehicle();

        System.out.println("vehicleCar " + vehicleCar.i());
        System.out.println("vehicleCar2 " + vehicleCar2.i());

    }
share|improve this answer

Your question is correct but Polymorphism works for functions only. It will not work for variable. It will take the reference type while executing variable not the exact object type that reference is pointing to.hope you will get it.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes i got it now. Thanks :) –  ziggy Aug 7 '11 at 11:04

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