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I am trying to get a simple example to work to understand how to use std::enable_if. After I read this answer, I thought it shouldn't be too hard to come up with a simple example. I want to use std::enable_if to choose between two member-functions and allow only one of them to be used.

Unfortunately, the following doesn't compile with gcc 4.7 and after hours and hours of trying I am asking you guys what my mistake is.

#include <utility>
#include <iostream>

template< class T >
class Y {

    public:
        template < typename = typename std::enable_if< true >::type >
        T foo() {
            return 10;
        }
        template < typename = typename std::enable_if< false >::type >
        T foo() {
            return 10;
        }

};


int main() {
    Y< double > y;

    std::cout << y.foo() << std::endl;
}

gcc reports the following problems:

% LANG=C make CXXFLAGS="-std=c++0x" enable_if
g++ -std=c++0x    enable_if.cpp   -o enable_if
enable_if.cpp:12:65: error: `type' in `struct std::enable_if<false>' does not name a type
enable_if.cpp:13:15: error: `template<class T> template<class> T Y::foo()' cannot be overloaded
enable_if.cpp:9:15: error: with `template<class T> template<class> T Y::foo()'

Why doesn't g++ delete the wrong instantiation for the second member function? According to the standard, std::enable_if< bool, T = void >::type only exists when the boolean template parameter is true. But why doesn't g++ consider this as SFINAE? I think that the overloading error message comes from the problem that g++ doesn't delete the second member function and believes that this should be an overload.

share|improve this question
1  
I am not sure, but I think it's the following: enable_if is based on SFINAE (substitution failure is not an error). However, you don't have any substitution here, because no parameter can't be used to determine which overload to use. You should make the "true" und "false" depend on T. (I know you did not want to do it in the simple example, but it's probably too simple now...) –  Philipp Aug 7 '11 at 11:13
1  
I thought of that too and tried to use std::is_same< T, int >::value and ! std::is_same< T, int >::value which gives the same result. –  evnu Aug 7 '11 at 11:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 46 down vote accepted

SFINAE only works if substitution in argument deduction of a template argument makes the construct ill-formed. There is no such substitution.

I thought of that too and tried to use std::is_same< T, int >::value and ! std::is_same< T, int >::value which gives the same result.

That's because when the class template is instantiated (which happens when you create an object of type Y<int> among other cases), it instantiates all its member declarations (not necessarily their definitions/bodies!). Among them are also its member templates. Note that T is known then, and !std::is_same< T, int >::value yields false. So it will create a class Y<int> which contains

class Y<int> {
    public:
        /* instantiated from
        template < typename = typename std::enable_if< 
          std::is_same< T, int >::value >::type >
        T foo() {
            return 10;
        }
        */

        template < typename = typename std::enable_if< true >::type >
        int foo();

        /* instantiated from

        template < typename = typename std::enable_if< 
          ! std::is_same< T, int >::value >::type >
        T foo() {
            return 10;
        }
        */

        template < typename = typename std::enable_if< false >::type >
        int foo();
};

The std::enable_if<false>::type accesses a non-existing type, so that declaration is ill-formed. And thus your program is invalid.

You need to make the member templates' enable_if depend on a parameter of the member template itself. Then the declarations are valid, because the whole type is still dependent. When you try to call one of them, argument deduction for their template arguments happen and SFINAE happens as expected. See this question and the corresponding answer on how to do that.

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6  
... Just to clarify, in case it's useful: When an instance of the Y template class is instantiated, the compiler will not actually compile the template member functions; however, the compiler WILL perform the substitution of T into the member template DECLARATIONS so that these member templates can be instantiated at a later time. This point of failure is not SFINAE, because SFINAE only applies when determining the set of possible functions for overload resolution, and instantiating a class is not a case of determining a set of functions for overload resolution. (Or so I think!) –  Dan Nissenbaum Mar 29 '13 at 15:57

I made this short example which also works.

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

using namespace std;

class A;
class B;

template<class T>
class C
{
    public:
        template<class Q = T>
        typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<Q, B>::value, bool>::type
        c()
        {
            return true;
        }

        template<class Q = T>
        typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<Q, B>::value, bool>::type
        c()
        {
            return false;
        }
};

int main() {
    C<A> ca;
    C<B> cb;
    if (!ca.c() && cb.c())
        cout << "It works!" << endl;
    return 0;
}

Comment if you want me to elaborate. I think the code is more or less self-explanatory, but then again I made it so I might be wrong :)

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't compile on VS2012. error C4519: default template arguments are only allowed on a class template. –  PythonNut Jun 7 '14 at 13:09
    
That's unfortunate. I only tested it on with gcc. Maybe this helps: stackoverflow.com/a/17543296/660982 –  jpihl Jun 10 '14 at 7:52
    
this is certainly the best answer here and exactly what I was looking for. –  pongba Dec 15 '14 at 20:26

One way to solve this problem, specialization of member functions is to put the specialization into another class, then inherit from that class. You may have to change the order of inheritence to get access to all of the other underlying data but this technique does work.

template< class T, bool condition> struct FooImpl;
template<class T> struct FooImpl<T, true> {
T foo() { return 10; }
};

template<class T> struct FoolImpl<T,false> {
T foo() { return 5; }
};

template< class T >
class Y : public FooImpl<T, boost::is_integer<T> > // whatever your test is goes here.
{
public:
    typedef FooImpl<T, boost::is_integer<T> > inherited;

    // you will need to use "inherited::" if you want to name any of the 
    // members of those inherited classes.
};

The disadvantage of this technique is that if you need to test a lot of different things for different member functions you'll have to make a class for each one, and chain it in the inheritence tree. This is true for accessing common data members.

Ex:

template<class T, bool condition> class Goo;
// repeat pattern above.

template<class T, bool condition>
class Foo<T, true> : public Goo<T, boost::test<T> > {
public:
    typedef Goo<T, boost::test<T> > inherited:
    // etc. etc.
};
share|improve this answer

For those late-comers that are looking for a solution that "just works":

#include <utility>
#include <iostream>

template< typename T >
class Y {

    template< bool cond, typename U >
    using resolvedType  = typename std::enable_if< cond, U >::type; 

    public:
        template< typename U = T > 
        resolvedType< true, U > foo() {
            return 11;
        }
        template< typename U = T >
        resolvedType< false, U > foo() {
            return 12;
        }

};


int main() {
    Y< double > y;

    std::cout << y.foo() << std::endl;
}

Compile with:

g++ -std=gnu++14 test.cpp 

Running gives:

./a.out 
11
share|improve this answer

The boolean needs to depend on the template parameter being deduced. So an easy way to fix is to use a default boolean parameter:

template< class T >
class Y {

    public:
        template < bool EnableBool = true, typename = typename std::enable_if<( std::is_same<T, double>::value && EnableBool )>::type >
        T foo() {
            return 10;
        }

};

However, this won't work if you want to overload the member function. Instead, its best to use TICK_MEMBER_REQUIRES from the Tick library:

template< class T >
class Y {

    public:
        TICK_MEMBER_REQUIRES(std::is_same<T, double>::value)
        T foo() {
            return 10;
        }

        TICK_MEMBER_REQUIRES(!std::is_same<T, double>::value)
        T foo() {
            return 10;
        }

};

You can also implement your own member requires macro like this(just in case you don't want to use another library):

template<long N>
struct requires_enum
{
    enum class type
    {
        none,
        all       
    };
};


#define MEMBER_REQUIRES(...) \
typename requires_enum<__LINE__>::type PrivateRequiresEnum ## __LINE__ = requires_enum<__LINE__>::type::none, \
class=typename std::enable_if<((PrivateRequiresEnum ## __LINE__ == requires_enum<__LINE__>::type::none) && (__VA_ARGS__))>::type
share|improve this answer
    
It didn't work for me that way. Maaybe something is missing? Could you rewrite the OP example in a working form, please? –  axeoth Sep 30 '14 at 18:12
    
The original example doesn't work with overloading. I updated my answer how you can do it with overloading. –  Paul Sep 30 '14 at 18:28

From this post:

Default template arguments are not part of the signature of a template

But one can do something like this:

#include <iostream>

struct Foo {
    template < class T,
               class std::enable_if < !std::is_integral<T>::value, int >::type = 0 >
    void f(const T& value)
    {
        std::cout << "Not int" << std::endl;
    }

    template<class T,
             class std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value, int>::type = 0>
    void f(const T& value)
    {
        std::cout << "Int" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Foo foo;
    foo.f(1);
    foo.f(1.1);

    // Output:
    // Int
    // Not int
}
share|improve this answer
    
It works, but this is basically templating functions, not the class itself... It does not allows dropping one of two identically-prototyped functions neither (when you need to pass over overloading). However, the idea is nice. Could you rewrite the OP example in a working form, please? –  axeoth Sep 30 '14 at 18:14

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