Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm teaching myself Python and I'm having difficulty with a relatively simple concept. The goal is to sort a list in ascending order using insertion sort. Here is the code:

def InsertionSort(A):
    for j in range(1, len(A)):
        key = A[j]
        i = j - 1
        while (i >=0) and (A[i] > key):
            A[i+1] = A[i] # this is the not understood point
            i = i - 1
        A[i+1] = key
    print A

I don't understand how the bolded step works. For example, if I had a list of [6,5,4,3,1] and I got to the second iteration, wouldn't my list now be [6,6,4,3,1]? I'm assigning A[i+1] (in the very first case it would be 5) the value of A[i] (6 in the first case). What happened to my 5? My original attempt at the code was:

def InsertionSort(A):
    for j in range(1, len(A)):
        key = A[j]
        i = j - 1
        while (i >=0) and (A[i] > key):
            temp = A[i+1]
            A [i+1] = A[i]
            A[i] = temp
            i = i - 1
        A[i+1] = key
    print A

This method works too. I don't understand why the first one does as well. Anyone want to take a stab?

share|improve this question
    
The study of algorithms != the study of a given programming language. The fact that you are using Python is only incidental to the question, which is about understanding the logic of an implementation of the algorithm. –  Karl Knechtel Aug 7 '11 at 14:36

2 Answers 2

I think it's just because of the line A[i+1]=key.

The first algorithm does the following: Consider the list [1,2,4,5,3], assume we are in iteration where j=4, i.e. we are considering list element 3. The algorighm stores the element 3 in key and checks the following:

[1,2,4,5,3]
       ^    5>3 (key) => move 5 forward by 1 => [1,2,4,5,5]
[1,2,4,5,5]
     ^      4>3 (key) => move 4 forward by 1 => [1,2,4,4,5]
[1,2,4,4,5]
   ^        2<3 => stop inner while loop
now, make A[i+1]=key (remember: key is 3):
[1,2,3,4,5]

In contrast to the above, the second algorithm actually swaps the elements in each iteration:

[1,2,4,5,3]
       ^    5>3 (key) => swap 5 and 3 => [1,2,4,3,5]
[1,2,4,3,5]
     ^      4>3 (key) => swap 4 and 3 => [1,2,3,4,5]
[1,2,3,4,5]
   ^        2<3 => stop while loop 
now, make A[i+1]=key (remember: key is 3): (this is unnecessary!)
[1,2,3,4,5]
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, got it. –  mv2323 Aug 7 '11 at 11:32

If you start with [6,5,4,3,1] the iterations will be as follows:

First step:

[6,5,4,3,1] 
    ## first number sorted`

Second step (j=2):

key <- 5

A <- [6,6,4,3,1], i <- -1  
    ## the 5 will be overridden but is still save in the key variable

A <- [5,6,4,3,1]        
    ## A[i+1] = key will restore the 5

The only value which can get "lost" is the one contained in A[j]. But this value is always saved in the variable key and can thus be restored in the very last step.

share|improve this answer
    
@mv2323: The point is that key remembers the value that you restore at the end of the loop, so you don't lose information. –  Omri Barel Aug 7 '11 at 11:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.