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here's a simple and short code I've been trying to run:

#include <stdio.h>

int const SIZE = 5;

void a(int *arr);

int main(){
    int arr[5] = {1,2,3,4,5};
    a(arr);
    return 0;
}

void a(int *arr){
    int *i;
    for (i=arr; i<&a[5]; i++)
            printf("%d",*arr[i]);
}

and i get the following errors/warnings:

main.c: In function ‘main’:
main.c:15: error: variable-sized object may not be initialized
main.c:15: warning: excess elements in array initializer
main.c:15: warning: (near initialization for ‘arr’)
main.c:15: warning: excess elements in array initializer
main.c:15: warning: (near initialization for ‘arr’)
main.c:15: warning: excess elements in array initializer
main.c:15: warning: (near initialization for ‘arr’)
main.c:15: warning: excess elements in array initializer
main.c:15: warning: (near initialization for ‘arr’)
main.c:15: warning: excess elements in array initializer
main.c:15: warning: (near initialization for ‘arr’)
main.c: In function ‘a’:
main.c:22: error: subscripted value is neither array nor pointer
main.c:23: error: array subscript is not an integer

the warning are all associated with the initialization of the array: if I put '5' instead of 'SIZE' its ok, why? The errors in a I don't get at all. I'm passing a pointer as an arguments, where's the problem? thatnks!

share|improve this question
    
you declare a constant and then don't use it. Please clean up your code... –  Mitch Wheat Aug 7 '11 at 12:52
1  
For improved readability, you could write i<arr+5instead of i<&arr[5]. So you know, arr[5] is replaced by *(arr+5) in the first steps of compilation, so &arr[5] becomes &*(arr+5) and the & voids the *. To finish this comment on array reference, as *(arr+5) is the same as *(5+arr), arr[5] is the same as 5[arr]. –  jfgagne Aug 7 '11 at 13:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Firstly, that should be:

for (i=arr; i<&arr[5]; i++)
               ^^^

But secondly, i is not an index, it's a pointer. So your print statement should be:

printf("%d",*i);
share|improve this answer
1  
Also arr only has 5 elements, so it should be &arr[4], but since there's a constant, it should be used instead (or a size passed in). And i is a pointer to the index, so referencing it should be i, not arr[i] –  tjameson Aug 7 '11 at 12:54
1  
@tjameson: &arr[5] is ok, as the comparison is <, not <=. –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 7 '11 at 12:56
    
No, arr[5] is out of the bounds of the array. You're taking the address of the next block (at the sixth element, which doesn't exist). –  tjameson Aug 7 '11 at 12:58
2  
@tjameson: It is legal C. The address of one-past-the-end is well-defined. –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 7 '11 at 12:58
1  
@tjameson: It is well-defined by the standard. –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 7 '11 at 13:01

Your code should presumably be:

void a(int *arr)
{
    int *i;
    for (i=arr; i < &arr[5]; i++)
            printf("%d",*i);
}

but why don't you just write the more understandable:

void PrintArray(int *arr, int size)
{
    int i;
    for (i=0; i < size; i++)
        printf("%d", arr[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Again, there are only 5 elements, so arr[5] will get the 6th element, which is an index out of bounds error. –  tjameson Aug 7 '11 at 12:57
    
see oli's comment "The address of one-past-the-end is well-defined. " –  Mitch Wheat Aug 7 '11 at 13:00

Arrays in C are indexed from zero. So the last element is arr[4], not arr[5]

share|improve this answer

Try this:

void a(int *arr, int size);

int main(){
    int arr[5] = {1,2,3,4,5};
    a(arr, 5);
    return 0;
}

void a(int *arr, int size){
    int i;
    for (i=0; i< size; i++)
        printf("%d", arr[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
for (i=arr; i< size; i++) is incorrect. –  Mitch Wheat Aug 7 '11 at 12:59
    
Oops, good catch. Copy paste error. –  tjameson Aug 7 '11 at 13:03

In C89 array-dimensions must known to compile-time, the content of an variable is'nt known at compile-time (also it is const), a define can known at compile-time. a strictly example show like this:

#include <stdio.h>

#define MY_ARRAY_SIZE 5  /* "SIZE" is a bad name for a #define */

typedef int MY_TYPE[MY_ARRAY_SIZE]; /* if possible, use your OWN types for your usecases */

void my_function(int *arr); /* "a" is a bad name for a function */

int main(){
    MY_TYPE arr = {1,2,3,4,5};
    my_function(arr);
    return 0;
}

void my_function(MY_TYPE arr){
    int i;
    for (i=0; i<sizeof(MY_TYPE)/sizeof*arr; i++)
            printf("%d",arr[i]);
}
share|improve this answer

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