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With ASP.net MVC I'm doing this:

[HttpPost]
[TransactionFilter]
public ActionResult Create(User user)
{
    // Ommited some things for the sake of brevity
    _userRepository.Add(user);
    return RedirectToAction("Details", new { Id = user.Id });
}

This works as I expected. Now I'm trying to do this:

[HttpPost]
[TransactionFilter]
public ActionResult Create(User user, ChildOfUser userChild)
{
    // Ommited some things for the sake of brevity
    var parent = _userRepository.GetById(user.Id);
    parent.Children.Add(userChild);

    return RedirectToAction("Details", new { Id = userChild.Id });
}

This fails because userChild.Id is null. The first case works because in the repo I call session.Save(user);, and this call will change the user.Id property.

The (User)parent.Children.Add(userChild); call won't change the userChild.Id property. Only after calling transaction.Commit(); the userChild.Id will have a meaningfull value. While I expect that the Id would be set by adding the userChild to the collection.

Now, should NHibernate handle this? Or are my expectations wrong? If there's a way to let NHibernate handle this that would be awesome.

EDIT The Id's in this case are always GUID's. Can I set them myself (they are Globally unique right...), and will NHibernate use that as if it generated the Id itself?

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1  
re your edit: yes NHibernate will use that, and client-side generated Id(e.g. GUID or HiLo) is performance-friendly to your ORM, consequently to your application. When you use pre-generated id, there would no more db roundtrip needed to fetch the parent Id; has less contention on your table too, post-generated Id tend to lock the table, every Id requester need to wait for Id generation, especially if the table is included in transaction. –  Michael Buen Aug 10 '11 at 11:03

3 Answers 3

The parent.Children.Add(userChild); has no bearing on NHibernate, they are in-memory operations, in fact they are part of base libraries of .NET, long time before someone ported Hibernate to .NET. collection.Add is not an NHibernate operation

Only after calling transaction.Commit(); the userChild.Id will have a meaningfull value. While I expect that the Id would be set by adding the userChild to the collection.

What you observed is correct, NHibernate's role on your objects will come into play only when you call the Save/Commit.

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1  
In theory, NHibernate could proxy the collection, and call session.Save(item) on Add (When Cascade is enabled). Otherwise this would mean that I have to delete by using a userChild repository. And that doesn't conform to the aggregate root principle of DDD (Only aggregate root have a repo) :s –  dvdvorle Aug 7 '11 at 15:09
1  
You can delete from aggregate root and NHibernate can happily delete its child entities too. –  Michael Buen Aug 7 '11 at 15:44
    
My bad, I meant "Add/Save" where I said "delete". –  dvdvorle Aug 7 '11 at 16:43
2  
If your mappings are correct you should be able to add the child to the collection in the parent object and then save the parent. This should push the child back to the database as well. It would look something like this: parent.Children.Add(userChild); _userRepository.Save(parent); –  AndyM Aug 7 '11 at 20:36
    
@AndyM that does sound interesting and would solve my problem, it doesn't work for me though. Are you sure that the userChild.Id will be set before calling transaction.Commit()? –  dvdvorle Aug 9 '11 at 20:19

Now, should NHibernate handle this?

No and this is due to the Unit of Work pattern. One line of reasoning behind the unit of work pattern is practical and is concerned with reducing the number of transactions and round trips to the database. Another reason for employing the unit of work pattern is that it aligns with a unit of work in a business sense - a unit of work defines the boundaries of an operation in the business domain. Since NHibernate does not know the nature of the business domain the declaration of the unit of work is delegated to the client. Furthermore, it is often advantageous to delegate the unit of work declaration outside of your persistence layer. See this question for examples.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've had this particular problem solved by using the ISession.Flush() method after using .Add()

I wouldn't recommend this practise though. Nowadays I set the Guid Id immediately in the entities constructor. This makes both MVC and NHibernate happy.

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