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i've got a few old mobos and i was wondering whether it might be possible to create a pair of pci header cards with interconnect wires and write some software to drive the interconnect cards to allow one of the mobos to access the cpu and ram on the other? i'm sure it would be an arduous undertaking involving writing a device driver for the header boards and then writing an application to make use of the interconnect; perhaps a simple demo demonstrating a thread running on each processor and use of both sets of ram, perhaps creating a mini virtual machine that maps 2x3gb ram on 32 bit mobos to a single 6 gb address space. a microcontroller may be needed on each pci header card to act as a translator.

given that mobos almost always have multiple pci slots, i wonder if these interconnected card pairs could be used to daisychain mobos in a sort of high speed beowulf cluster.

i would use debian for each mobo and probably just an atmega128 for each card with a couple of ribbon cables for interconnecting.

pci is basically just an io bus, so i don't see why this shouldn't be possible (but it would be pretty hard going).

does anyone have any advice or has this sort of thing been done before?

Update:

Thanks Martin. What you say makes sense, and it would also seem that if it were possible that it would have already been done before.

Instead, would it be possible to indirectly control the slave cpu by booting it using a "pretend" bootable storage device (hard disk, usb stick, etc)? As long as the slave mobo thinks its being operated by an operating system on a real device it should work.

This could potentially extend to any interface (sata, ide, usb etc); if you connected two pcs together with a sata/ide/usb cable (plug one end of an ide ribbon into one mobo and the other into another mobo), that would be all the hardware you need. the key is in creating a new driver for that interface on the master pc, so instead of the master pc treating that interface as having a storage device on it, it would be driven as a dummy bootable hard disk for the slave computer. this would still be a pretty difficult job for me because i've never done device drivers before, but at least i wouldn't need a soldering iron (which would be much further beyond me). i might be able to take an open source ide driver for linux, study it, and then butcher it to create something that kindof acts in reverse (instead of getting data off it, an application puts data onto it for the slave machine to access like a hard disk). i could then take a basic linux kernel and try booting the slave computer from an application on the master computer (via the butchered master pc ide/sata/usb device driver). for safety, i would probably try to isolate my customised driver as much as possible by targeting an interface not being used for anything else on the master pc (the master pc might use all sata hard disks with the ide bus normally unused, so if i created a custom ide driver it might cause less problems with the host system - because it is sata driven).

Does anyone know if anything like this (faking a bootable hard disk from another pc) has ever been tried before? It would make a pretty cool hackaday on youtube, but also seriously it could add a new dimension to parallel computing if it proved promising.

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2 Answers 2

The PCI bus can't take over the other CPU.

You could make an interconnect that can transfer data from a program on one machine to another. An ethernet card is the most common implementation but for high performance clusters there are faster direct connections like infiband.

Unfortunately PCI is more difficult to build cards for than the old ISA bus, you need surface mount controller chips and specific track layouts to match the impedance requirements of PCI. Going faster than a few megabit/s involves understanding things like transmission lines and the characteristics of the connection cable.

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would use debian for each mobo and probably just an atmega128 for each card with a couple of ribbon cables for interconnecting.

pci is basically just an io bus, so i don't see why this shouldn't be possible (but it would be pretty hard going).

LOL. PCI is an 32-Bit 33MHz Bus at minimum. So simply out of reach for an ATMEGA.

But your idea of:

a pair of pci header cards with interconnect wires and write some software to drive the interconnect cards to allow one of the mobos to access the cpu and ram on the other [...]

This is cheaply possible with just a pair of PCI Firewire (IEEE 1394) cards (and a Firewire cable). There is even a linux driver that allows remote debugging over firewire.

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