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I am not sure the title is clear enough. I have a dataframe (see below) which contains values across 5 columns. What I would like to do is to "split" this dataframe into three classes where the rows can be assigned into a "High", "Medium", "Low" state.

What I mean is :

High: the values are "high" in at least 3 columns

Medium: the values are "medium" in a least 3 columns

Low: the values are "Low"(or NA) in a least 3 columns

I guess it involve two things, defining the value cutoff for the 3 groups, then assinging rows into High, Medium and Low category... but thats a guess

The data file is available here

tmp = read.table("tmp2.txt", header=TRUE)
head(tmp)
           Geneid     Hsap      Mmul      Mmus      Rnor     Cfam
1 ENSG00000197711 365823.5 243429.20 44337.267 156874.50 128015.0
2 ENSG00000198712 198613.0        NA 47767.767 200176.50 210559.8
3 ENSG00000198899 189421.5        NA        NA 283425.50 367112.8
4 ENSG00000198804 182559.5        NA 87301.900 277861.00 324438.0
5 ENSG00000198840 142424.5        NA  8400.457  45844.80 115027.9
6 ENSG00000171564 119147.9  93564.66  6675.290  45938.85  45140.2

Any advices strongly appreciated, as I don't have the slightest idea on how to tackle this !

Thanks,


This is the answer below :

I have now replaced the file by a more realistic one (more rows)

tbl <- read.csv("http://db.tt/L2ehGh8", header=FALSE)
colnames(tbl) <- c("Geneid","Hsap","Mmul","Mmus","Rnor","Cfam")

Using cut() : I have lots of 0s, and the values are quiet stretched, so by using log, or here asinh, you get rid of this.

tbl.data <- apply(asinh(tbl.data),2,
                  function(x) as.numeric(as.factor(cut(x,4)))  )
head(tbl.data)
     Hsap Mmul Mmus Rnor Cfam
[1,]    2    2    1    1    2
[2,]    2    2    2    2    2
[3,]    1    1    1    1    1
[4,]    1    1    1    1    1
[5,]    2    3    2    2    3
[6,]    2    2    2    2    2

Another way is to use Quantiles, which as been shown to me.

quantile(tbl.data[,1],0.25)
quantile(tbl.data[,1],0.5)
quantile(tbl.data[,1],0.75)

tbl.data2 <- apply(tbl.data,2,
                   function(x) as.numeric(as.factor(cut(x,c(-1,
                       quantile(x, 0.25)+0.0001,
                       quantile(x,0.5),
                       quantile(x,0.75), max(x))))))
head(tbl.data2)
     Hsap Mmul Mmus Rnor Cfam
[1,]    3    3    3    2    3
[2,]    2    3    4    3    3
[3,]    2    1    1    1    2
[4,]    1    2    1    1    1
[5,]    4    4    4    4    4
[6,]    3    4    4    3    4
share|improve this question
    
Do you want 3 separate data.frames to result? Or do you just want to add another column assigned to low, medium, or high? –  kmm Aug 7 '11 at 17:28
    
You should avoid the use of t as a variable name, since it's an internal function (transpose a matrix). –  Ari B. Friedman Aug 7 '11 at 17:28
    
Either way is fine - I guess the most convenient would be to have an extra column with (H, M, L) or something like that –  Benoit B. Aug 7 '11 at 17:30
    
If you divide those 5 columns into tertiles based on the individual column values, you will get a bunch of H H M L L or M M H H L or NA NA M H H rows that have no specified category. Do you want them discarded? –  BondedDust Aug 7 '11 at 17:39
    
there are undefined cases. what do you do when there are 2 Highs, 1 Medium and 2 Lows in a row? what does it get classified as? –  Ramnath Aug 7 '11 at 17:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming you want NAs to be handled by not counting them rather than tossing the whole row:

tbl <- read.table("http://db.tt/Eb6qM4h",header=TRUE)
tbl.data <- subset(tbl,select=-Geneid)
tbl.data <- apply(tbl.data,2,function(x) as.numeric(as.factor(cut(x,3)))  )


countLevels <- function(tbl.data,lvl) {
  apply(tbl.data,1,function(x) sum( x[!is.na(x)] == lvl ) )
}

tbl.final <- tbl.new <- subset(tbl,select=Geneid)
for(lvl in seq(3) ) {
  tbl.new[,paste('Level',lvl)] <- (countLevels(tbl.data,lvl) > 3) * lvl
}

tbl.final$Levels <- rowSums(subset(tbl.new,select=-Geneid))

Which returns the data.frame as follows:

> head(tbl.final,20)
            Geneid Levels
1  ENSG00000197711      0
2  ENSG00000198712      0
3  ENSG00000198899      0
4  ENSG00000198804      0
5  ENSG00000198840      0
6  ENSG00000171564      1
7  ENSG00000171557      1
8  ENSG00000198727      1
9  ENSG00000163631      0
10 ENSG00000198888      1
11 ENSG00000198695      1
12 ENSG00000198763      1
13 ENSG00000198786      1
14 ENSG00000158874      0
15 ENSG00000138207      1
16 ENSG00000109072      1
17 ENSG00000130203      3
18 ENSG00000106927      1
19 ENSG00000110169      1
20 ENSG00000104760      1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks gsk3 - I understand what you are doing with "tbl.data" but I am not sure I understand tbl.new! A single row either can be High, Medium or Low, so, I am a bit confused here. Maybe I missed something –  Benoit B. Aug 7 '11 at 20:03
    
If you want it as a single column that captures all 3 levels I've changed it to one way to do it. Unfortunately the data doesn't seem to have any where all 3 are in the middle or high group, so it's not showing up, but it should give you Level=={1,2,3}. I assume you'd want more substantive to group things into l/m/h categories; cut is really just a placeholder.... –  Ari B. Friedman Aug 7 '11 at 20:16
    
Thanks gsk3 - I am now using a dataframe which contains more rows. However I only get levels "1" when applying your code. Odd. –  Benoit B. Aug 8 '11 at 8:39
    
Row 17 has 3 high groupings, and it seems to work. Added more output so you can see above. –  Ari B. Friedman Aug 8 '11 at 8:52

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