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I'm having difficulty writing a program to solve this exercise from a Java text book:

Write a method raiseRealToPower that takes a floating-point value x and an integer k and returns xk. Implement your method so that it can correctly calculate the result when k is negative, using the relationship x^(-k) = 1 / x^k.

Use your method to display a table of values of πk for all values of k from –4 to 4.

I didn't done this part with PI, i know that, if my programs starts to work... this is what i done... tell me please, what is wrong.

import acm.program.*;

public class vjezba55 extends ConsoleProgram {

    private static final double PI = 3.14159253;

    public void run() {
        double x = readDouble ("x: ");
        double k = readDouble ("k: ");
        println ("x^k = " + raiseDoublePower(x,k)); 
    }

    /* Method that counts x^k */
    private double raiseDoublePower (double x, double k){
        if (k >= 0) {
            return Math.pow(x, k);
        }
        else {
            double total = 1;
            for (int i= 0; i>k; i--) {
                total = (double) 1 / x;
            }
            return total;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why problems are you having? – Jeffrey Aug 7 '11 at 17:46
    
if u insert x = 2 and k = -3 it gives back 0.5 instead of 0.125. – cyb3r Aug 7 '11 at 17:47
    
Using Math.pow surely counts as cheating here. – Henning Makholm Aug 7 '11 at 20:02
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't understand the part in the question regarding PI, but your method may be much simpler (according to using the relationship x^(-k) = 1 / x^k):

private double raiseDoublePower (double x, double k){
    if (k >= 0) {
        return Math.pow(x, k);
    }
    else {
        return 1 /  Math.pow(x, -k);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
Careful with that minus sign... – Oliver Charlesworth Aug 7 '11 at 17:50
    
Will try this, also! Thank you! – cyb3r Aug 7 '11 at 17:51
    
@Oli Charlesworth - why is that? – MByD Aug 7 '11 at 17:53
    
oh, yes, it's faster and more efficient code then mine. – cyb3r Aug 7 '11 at 17:55
    
@MyByD: Oh, my mistake. Sorry! – Oliver Charlesworth Aug 7 '11 at 17:55

Take a look at your loop code. You are just recalculating total from scratch on each iteration, rather than updating the previous result.

share|improve this answer
    
total += (double) 1 / x should work for the OP. – fireshadow52 Aug 7 '11 at 17:49
    
@fireshadow: Maybe *=... – Oliver Charlesworth Aug 7 '11 at 17:50
    
Oh man, im stupid. Thank you! – cyb3r Aug 7 '11 at 17:51
    
Works with *= ... – cyb3r Aug 7 '11 at 17:52

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