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I'm trying to convert strings that match /(\d)+(\.\d+)?(m|g|t)?b?/i into bytes.

For example, 1KB would return 1024. 1.2mb would return 1258291.

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1  
-1 : b=bit, B=byte –  vol7ron Aug 7 '11 at 18:38
    
i don't care about calculating bits in this situation –  DeaDEnD Aug 7 '11 at 19:32
    
use the correct abbreviation –  vol7ron Aug 7 '11 at 22:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you reorganize the capturing group in your regex like so: /(\d+(?:\.\d+)?)\s?(k|m|g|t)?b?/i you can do something like:

function unhumanize(text) { 
    var powers = {'k': 1, 'm': 2, 'g': 3, 't': 4};
    var regex = /(\d+(?:\.\d+)?)\s?(k|m|g|t)?b?/i;

    var res = regex.exec(text);

    return res[1] * Math.pow(1024, powers[res[2].toLowerCase()]);
}

unhumanize('1 Kb')
# 1024
unhumanize('1 Mb')
# 1048576
unhumanize('1 Gb')
# 1073741824
unhumanize('1 Tb')
# 1099511627776
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2  
-1 : b=bit, B=byte –  vol7ron Aug 7 '11 at 18:37
    
If you stored powers of 2 in the table instead of powers of 1024, you could use a bitshift for the calculation (which is generally much faster that the power function). –  Ben Voigt Aug 7 '11 at 18:38
    
@vol7ron: You should take that complaint up with the question which uses them interchangeably, not the answer. –  Ben Voigt Aug 7 '11 at 18:38
    
@ben: I take it up with both, and will change the vote when it has changed, otherwise not a bad solution –  vol7ron Aug 7 '11 at 18:39
    
@Ben : sadly the bit shifting in javascript is mostly 32 bit (depending on the js engine of course) stackoverflow.com/questions/2373791/bitshift-in-javascript so : 1 << 32 === 1. –  mouad Aug 7 '11 at 19:02

You've already got a capturing group for the unit prefix, now all you need is a lookup table:

{ 'k', 1L<<10 },
{ 'M', 1L<<20 },
{ 'G', 1L<<30 },
{ 'T', 1L<<40 },
{ 'P', 1L<<50 },
{ 'E', 1L<<60 }

Demo: http://ideone.com/5O7Vp

Although 1258291 is clearly far too many significant digits to get from 1.2MB.

oops, I gave a C# example. The method is still good though.

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I get the idea. but shifting doesn't work with floats. –  DeaDEnD Aug 7 '11 at 18:16
1  
@DeaDEnD: I'm not shifting floats. You can multiply a float by the integer result of a shift just fine. –  Ben Voigt Aug 7 '11 at 18:34
    
+1 good solution –  vol7ron Aug 7 '11 at 18:41
    
ah ok I didn't understand it fully at first –  DeaDEnD Aug 7 '11 at 19:31
    
Hmmm... 1 << 10 === 1024 1 << 20 === 1048576 1 << 30 === 1073741824 1 << 40 === 256 1 << 50 === 262144 1 << 60 === 268435456. –  yckart Mar 26 '13 at 18:46

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