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On my site I'm trying to get locations nearby.

I'm trying to use the Haversine formula for this.

I'm using the following query to get all the locations within a 25km radius.

SELECT id, ( 6371 * acos( cos( radians(51.8391) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * cos( radians( lng ) - radians(4.6265) ) + sin( radians(51.8391) ) * sin( radians( lat ) ) ) ) AS distance
FROM shops
HAVING distance < 25
ORDER BY name asc

However I think some functions may be MySQL only, because I get the following error:

Warning: PDOStatement::execute() [pdostatement.execute]: SQLSTATE[42883]: Undefined function: 7 ERROR: function radians(text) does not exist LINE 1: ...id, ( 6371 * acos( cos( radians(51.8391) ) * cos( radians( l... ^ HINT: No function matches the given name and argument types. You might need to add explicit type casts. in ...

Or perhaps it has to do with tha fact I have to change the text lat in my query. But I don't know what it should be.

51.8391 and 4.6265 are the long and lat of my 'starting' point.

Any help is much appreciated since I don't have any idea what to change :-)

EDIT

It looks like that the problem is where I try to do: radians(lat).

lat is a column in my table.

When I try to use rad() as hakre suggested the error changes to: function rad(numeric) does not exist

EDIT 2

Now we're getting somewhere.

The datatype of the columns where indeed set as text (as suggested by mu is too short).

I've changed it to double precision.

However now I get another error:

Warning: PDOStatement::execute() [pdostatement.execute]: SQLSTATE[42703]: Undefined column: 7 ERROR: column "distance" does not exist LINE 1: ...adians( lat ) ) ) ) AS distance FROM shops HAVING distance <... ^ in ...

But I thought I made an alias in the select. Any ideas?

Also if you guys think this should go in another question just let me know and I will close this one.

share|improve this question
    
@hakre: nopez no luck. See edit –  PeeHaa Aug 7 '11 at 20:53
    
Was a quick shot only (sorry it did not work :)), see how to define functions in postgresql, so you can apply that in queries more easily (and faster) (and see as well pgfoundry.org/projects/pgsphere). –  hakre Aug 7 '11 at 20:56
1  
NB: this isn't the Haversine formula - this is the simpler cosine-based formula. Haversine is much more complicated, but is more accurate unless using high precision (e.g. double) arithmetic. –  Alnitak Aug 7 '11 at 21:01
2  
personally I think the new bit should be a separate question, but there's plenty questions here already about "having vs where" –  Alnitak Aug 7 '11 at 21:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

PostgreSQL does have a radians function:

radians(dp)
degrees to radians

but radians wants a floating point argument and you are trying to give it a string of some sort:

Undefined function: 7 ERROR: function radians(text)
[...] HINT: No function matches the given name and argument types. You might need to add explicit type casts.

Emphasis mine. Apparently your lat and lng columns are char(n), varchar(n), or text columns. You should fix the column types for lat and lng to be numeric, float, or some other floating point type; in the mean time, you can cast your strings by hand and hope that you don't have any broken data:

radians(cast(lat as double precision))

MySQL does a lot of implicit type conversions, PostgreSQL is rather more strict and requires you to say exactly what you mean.


Update for the second problem: The HAVING clause is evaluated before the SELECT clause so column aliases in the SELECT are not generally available anywhere else in the query. You have a couple options, you can repeat your big ugly Haversine:

SELECT id, ( 6371 * acos( cos( radians(51.8391) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * cos( radians( lng ) - radians(4.6265) ) + sin( radians(51.8391) ) * sin( radians( lat ) ) ) ) AS distance
FROM shops
HAVING ( 6371 * acos( cos( radians(51.8391) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * cos( radians( lng ) - radians(4.6265) ) + sin( radians(51.8391) ) * sin( radians( lat ) ) ) ) < 25
ORDER BY name asc

Or use a derived table to avoid repeating yourself:

select id, distance
from (
    select id, name, ( 6371 * acos( cos( radians(51.8391) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * cos( radians( lng ) - radians(4.6265) ) + sin( radians(51.8391) ) * sin( radians( lat ) ) ) ) as distance
    from shops
) as dt
where distance < 25.0
order by name asc
share|improve this answer
    
Great. Looks like that was indeed the problem. I now get another error however :( Thanks for your help so far! So edited question if you like, or if you don't wanna also fine! :) –  PeeHaa Aug 7 '11 at 21:12
1  
@PeeHaa: Have a look at my update please. –  mu is too short Aug 7 '11 at 21:25
    
many many thanks! I will use the first option since the formula is already in a variable. –  PeeHaa Aug 7 '11 at 21:28

Conversion to radians is trivial:

radians(n) = n * PI / 180.0
share|improve this answer
    
Would that be possible to do with column(-data)? Since that is what needs to be done I think. Not sure though... Also see my edit –  PeeHaa Aug 7 '11 at 20:54
1  
PostgreSQL has a radians function, the problem is that lat and lng are not numeric. –  mu is too short Aug 7 '11 at 20:58
1  
sure - just store radian data in your DB instead of degrees. better yet, see this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/6409035/… –  Alnitak Aug 7 '11 at 20:59
3  
and like @mu says - store numbers as numbers, not as text!! –  Alnitak Aug 7 '11 at 20:59
    
@Alnitak: yeah yeah that was just me being dumb :) –  PeeHaa Aug 7 '11 at 21:13

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