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in Jack Shirazi book "Java Performance Tuning", he presents a way to optimize conversion from double to String. the code of the optimization can be found here:

however, there seem to be some issue with specific numbers for a 2 digits display, when using the method with 0.0951 (until 0.0999) it returns "0.0a", which is obviously incorrect. when running it with 0.0949, it correctly returns 0.09. when running it with 1.0951 it correctly return 1.10.

any idea about what's wrong ? I'm trying to understand the small bits, but haven't found the culprit yet.

here's my test main:

public DoubleToString() {
double d1 = 0.0949;
double d2 = 0.0951;

StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();

sb.append("display d1 = ");
appendFormatted(sb, d1, 2, '.', ',', 3, '-', '-');
sb.append(" : ");
appendFormatted(sb, d2, 2, '.', ',', 3, '-', '-');

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perhaps you should contact Jack Shirazi ? – Mitch Wheat Aug 8 '11 at 2:55

1 Answer 1

Strong suggestion:

  1. Create a benchmark that does 100,000 or a million double-to-string conversions in a loop.

  2. Get the timing for using "appendFormatted()"

  3. Compare the timing for using the standard Java DecimalFormat (as of Java 1.4, 2002) or printf Formatter (as of Java 5, 2004)

  4. Consider that this article was written back in 2000 ... and many of the "optimizations" he talks about are undoubtedly completely obsolete with respect to current JDK's and JVM's.


share|improve this answer
Interesting comment. I did just that, and the results imply Shirazi's method is still much faster than both DecimalFormat & Formatter. looped 10,000,000: appendFormatted = 5.3s, DecimalFormat = 31.3s, Formatter = 63.2s – Bastien Aug 8 '11 at 5:18

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