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Here is only an example from my code. I'm looking for a good way to maintain my classes in order and following some OOP rules.

This my abstract class Problem:

public abstract class Problem<T> : IEquatable<T>
{
    public abstract int ResultCount { get; }
    protected abstract bool CheckTheAnswer(params object[] results);
    public abstract bool Equals(T other);
}

Below is one class which derives from Problem, Arithetic class contains all the necessary that contains in a math problem, and how to resolve it:

public enum Operations
{
    Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, Division
}

public class Arithmetic : Problem<Arithmetic>
{
    public decimal Number1
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public Operations Operation
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public decimal Number2
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public override int ResultCount
    {
        get { return 1; }
    }

    protected override bool CheckTheAnswer(params object[] results)
    {
        if (results.Length != ResultCount)
            throw new ArgumentException("Only expected " + ResultCount + " arguments.");

        decimal result = (decimal)results[0];

        switch (Operation)
        {
            case Operations.Addition:
                return Number1 + Number2 == result;
            case Operations.Subtraction:
                return Number1 - Number2 == result;
            case Operations.Multiplication:
                return Number1 * Number2 == result;
            case Operations.Division:
                return Number1 / Number2 == result;
            default:
                throw new Exception("Operator unexpected");
        }
    }

    public override bool Equals(Arithmetic other)
    {
        if (other == null)
            return false;

        return this.Number1 == other.Number1 && Number2 == other.Number2;
    }
}

public class Addition : Arithmetic
{
    public Addition(decimal addend1, decimal addend2)
        : base()
    {
        Number1 = addend1;
        Number2 = addend2;
        Operation = Operations.Addition;
    }
}

// Subtraction, Multiplication and Divison here

Then I have another class which generate an Arithmetic problem, it receives a Tuple where contains some properties that indicates the conditions

interface IProblemFactory<T> where T : Problem<T>
{
    T Create();
}

public class ArithmeticProblemFactory : IProblemFactory<Arithmetic>
{
    private Tuple<Operations, Range, Range> _condition;

    public ArithmeticProblemFactory(Tuple<Operations, Range, Range> condition)
    {
        this._condition = condition;
    }

    public Arithmetic Create()
    {
        Operations operation = _condition.Item1;
        decimal a = _condition.Item2.GetNumber();
        decimal b = _condition.Item3.GetNumber();

        switch (operation)
        {
            case Operations.Addition:
                return new Addition(a, b);
            case Operations.Subtraction:
                return new Subtraction(a, b);
            case Operations.Multiplication:
                return new Multiplication(a, b);
            case Operations.Division:
                return new Division(a, b);
            default:
                throw new Exception("Operator unexpected");
        }
    }
}

The thing is... I need to have more properties, like Result (in Arithmetic class only needs 1, in comparison 2 numbers we need two properties result), problem number, time (seconds) to resolve the problem.

The question is, I don't know where I should put these properties. One way it'll be adding some of them in Problem class, or create another class something like these:

ArithmeticProblem

  • Problem Problem <-- Here is Arithmetic class

  • Result

  • Time

  • Problem number

I only want to organize my classes as must be. Thanks in advance.

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2  
I would suggest to first cleanup the design you have now and then move forwards. What is the point of the Operation enumeration? You have subclasses for every type of arithmetic operation, so you don't need the enum. Refactor those switch statements to class hierarchy by moving the code in switch branches into implementations of abstract methods in Arithmetic class. Also if you want to use Equals method, consider comparing on the type of the operation. –  Gabriel Ščerbák Aug 8 '11 at 10:58
    
@Gabriel nice suggestions. –  Int3 ὰ Aug 8 '11 at 11:04
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can have different classes for result and in your Arithmetic class accept result type as generic:

public class Arithmetic < TResult> : ...

and Addition can be as bellow:

public class Addition : Arithmetic <decimal>
...

but if the number of parameters (like result, time, ...) are not fixed (dynamic) you can have a dictionary and store them in dictionary (their type) and write specific action and set them as value of dictionary.

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please, watch this question.. it's the same question but more specific stackoverflow.com/questions/6988431/… –  oscar.fimbres Aug 8 '11 at 20:55
    
@oscar.fimbres, I can't find any difference between this problems, Please edit current problem. –  Saeed Amiri Aug 8 '11 at 21:00
    
Well the only thing that I wanted you to know is I need to preserve different datatypes like answer and the problems might have more of one result (result1 and result2). I was thinking if there's neccesity to create another class to store all the answer for each math problem –  oscar.fimbres Aug 8 '11 at 21:12
    
@oscar.fimbres, you can define a class for different results and pass them as generic parameter ( I mentioned this in my answer). –  Saeed Amiri Aug 8 '11 at 21:13
    
But don't you think is better creating another class speacially to store the answer for this problem? I mean, one class for the problem, another for the answer (these contains the CheckThe...) I said these because later maybe I need to cast each one of these to get the results. –  oscar.fimbres Aug 8 '11 at 21:25
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I would suggest placing the Result, Time (to generate or solve), and Problem Number all inside the problem class. Each problem will have its own result, time, and number; they may as well be included. This relieves you of linking another class to each problem as well as having an all-inclusive problem class.

share|improve this answer
    
On the one hand I think so too, but the problems contains different datatypes in Result.. some of them the Result is a class Fraction, others are decimals, etc. Do you think is convenient to have an Answer class? –  oscar.fimbres Aug 8 '11 at 16:38
    
Well, if you wanted to store your result as a floating point value, you could add a method to convert it to a fraction and still have it all inside your Problem class :) –  Xiphos Aug 8 '11 at 17:00
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