Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have strange issue with nested left-joins in postgresql... It's hard to explain, but easy to show =) here we are:

SELECT * FROM
(
    SELECT 1 as key1
) sub1
LEFT JOIN 
(
    SELECT sub3.key3, sub4.value2 FROM
    (
        SELECT 1 as key3
    ) sub3
    LEFT JOIN 
    (
        SELECT sub5.key5, COALESCE(sub6.value1, 1) as value2
        FROM
        (
            SELECT 1 as key5
        ) sub5
        LEFT JOIN
        (
            SELECT 1 as key6, value1
            FROM
            (
                SELECT NULL::integer as value1
            ) sub7
            WHERE false
        ) sub6 ON false

    )
    sub4 ON sub4.key5=sub3.key3
)
sub2 ON sub1.key1 = sub2.key3

The result of this query:

key1;key3;value2
1;1;NULL

And this is the problem - value2 can't be NULL because of COALESCE in sub4 (at least I think that it can't be =)) Anyway if we'll change

SELECT sub3.key3, sub4.value2 FROM

with

SELECT sub3.key3, value2 FROM

we will got correct result:

key1;key3;value2
1;1;1

Is there something wrong with my mind&hands? or is it a bug?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Nobody is going to be able to reproduce that if you are not posting the table definitions and the data in the tables. –  Peter Eisentraut Aug 8 '11 at 10:40
    
@Peter: what table definitions? There are no tables. –  Lukas Eder Aug 8 '11 at 11:58
    
@listar, that's a pretty crazy finding, even if your SQL is not exactly simple to understand. But I'd also expect value2 = 1. Have you tried expressing your COALESCE as a CASE expression? –  Lukas Eder Aug 8 '11 at 11:59
    
@Peter: Lukas is right - there isn't any table definition =) –  listar Aug 8 '11 at 12:32
    
@Lukas: yes, I tried and the result is the same =( that why I asked my question here... if the problem was in coalesce, I would try to look in sources as I did before... but this is to difficult to investigate by source code =))PS and I'm sorry for my english =) –  listar Aug 8 '11 at 12:38

2 Answers 2

I have translated your query to Oracle syntax and I get the expected result

+------+------+--------+
| KEY1 | KEY3 | VALUE2 |
+------+------+--------+
|    1 |    1 |      1 |
+------+------+--------+

resulting from

SELECT * FROM (
    SELECT 1 as key1 from dual
) sub1
LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT sub3.key3, sub4.value2 FROM (
        SELECT 1 as key3 from dual
    ) sub3
    LEFT JOIN (
        SELECT sub5.key5, COALESCE(sub6.value1, 1) as value2
        FROM (
            SELECT 1 as key5 from dual
        ) sub5
        LEFT JOIN (
            SELECT 1 as key6, value1
            FROM (
                SELECT cast(NULL as NUMBER(7)) as value1 from dual
            ) sub7
            WHERE 1=0
        ) sub6 ON 1=0
    )
    sub4 ON sub4.key5 = sub3.key3
)
sub2 ON sub1.key1 = sub2.key3

Also, from reading this rather odd query, I still think that the result you get from Postgres is wrong. I think you can safely file this as a bug to Postgres

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot!!! I'll report this issue as a bug to postgres team –  listar Aug 8 '11 at 12:56
1  
I guess the bug could be related to the "always false" condition, which might be interpreted too optimistically by the query execution optimiser... –  Lukas Eder Aug 8 '11 at 12:59
    
maybe you are right =) but I think at the moment only source code investigation could shed some light on this, but, as I said before, I'm not ready for such investigation =)) I'll wait for reaction from postgresql team =) –  listar Aug 8 '11 at 13:08
    
I wouldn't look at that source code either. I imagine the depths of nested outer join query plan calculation reach the complexity of quantum physics ;-) –  Lukas Eder Aug 8 '11 at 13:13
    
you are absolutely right!! =)) besides, quantum physics is a little bit more interesting I think =)) –  listar Aug 8 '11 at 13:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I got answer from postgresql team. Verdict:

This is on HEAD from today.  Clearly there's a problem.

So, it was (and it is) a bug. Thanks for all, who participated in this issue! =)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.