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I have this sample code and I am trying to figure out what is going on.

    private static AutoResetEvent autoEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);
    private static Thread t1;
    static void DoSomething()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Main starting.");

        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
            WorkMethod, autoEvent);

        // Wait for work method to signal.
        autoEvent.WaitOne();

        // trying out does resource cleanup by using dispose and null where possible
        autoEvent.SafeWaitHandle.Dispose();
        t1 = null;
        autoEvent = null;
        autoEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);
        Console.WriteLine("Work method signaled.\nMain ending.");
    }

    static Action messageTarget; 

    static void WorkMethod(object stateInfo)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Work starting.");
          // This line is going to change
          messageTarget =  delegate()
                 {
                     Thread.Sleep(new Random().Next(100, 2000));
                 };

        // Signal that work is finished.
        Console.WriteLine("Work ending.");
        ((AutoResetEvent)stateInfo).Set();
    }

This works away fine and creates 7 handles after a for loop of 100 cycles (handle count using TestApi's Memory Snapshot).

Now the interesting behavior is this: When I wrap the delegate in a thread

        t1 = new Thread
            (
          delegate()
                 {
                     Thread.Sleep(new Random().Next(100, 2000));
                 });
        t1.Start();

The application finishes with approximately 295 handles!

I heard that .net framework is poor with threading and cleaning up resources, is this correct? It is possible some of the threads are still running in the background when the application finishes but sure this is a bit extreme behavior?

My question is what is going on to cause such a high handle count? (Please note this is simulating some behavior in another application and is not meant for production, but rather to understand why the handle count grows so dramatically when using threads)

Solution with Thread.Join

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Threading;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using Microsoft.Test.LeakDetection;

namespace FaultDetection
{
     public partial class Form1 : Form
     {
      private Process process;

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        foreach (Process clsProcess in Process.GetProcesses())
        {

            if (clsProcess.ProcessName.Contains("FaultDetection"))
            {
                //if the process is found to be running then we
                //return a true
                process = clsProcess;
            }
        }

        MemorySnapshot s1;
        if (process != null)
        {
            s1 = MemorySnapshot.FromProcess(process.Id);

            for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
            {
                DoSomething();
                MemorySnapshot s2 = MemorySnapshot.FromProcess(process.Id);

                // Compare the two memory snapshots and generate a diff.
                // Then display the diff to the console.
                MemorySnapshot diff = s2.CompareTo(s1);

                Console.WriteLine("\tHandle Count: {0}", diff.HandleCount);
                label1.Text = "Handle Count: "+ diff.HandleCount + "\n";
            }
        }
    }

    private static AutoResetEvent autoEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);
    private static Thread t1;
    private static List<Thread> threadReferences;

    static void DoSomething()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Main starting.");

        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
            WorkMethod, autoEvent);

        // Wait for work method to signal.
        autoEvent.WaitOne();

        t1.Join();
        autoEvent.SafeWaitHandle.Dispose();
        t1 = null;
        autoEvent = null;
        autoEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);
        Console.WriteLine("Work method signaled.\nMain ending.");
    }

    static Action messageTarget; 

    static void WorkMethod(object stateInfo)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Work starting.");
        t1 = new Thread
            (
          delegate()
                 {
                     Thread.Sleep(new Random().Next(100, 2000));
                 });
        t1.Start();
        //messageTarget = delegate() { Thread.Sleep(new Random().Next(100, 2000)); };

        // Signal that work is finished.
        Console.WriteLine("Work ending.");
        ((AutoResetEvent)stateInfo).Set();
    }
}

}

share|improve this question
    
Before you take your measurements, ensure that all objects have been properly garbage collected: GC.Collect(); GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers(); How many extra handles then? If you run the loop 1000 times do you get more handles? – Tim Lloyd Aug 8 '11 at 10:09
    
tops out around the 40 mark still, for 1000 cycles it tops out around 35 - 40 handles and remains there – oliveromahony Aug 8 '11 at 10:38
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Firstly, the .Net framework is not poor with threading and cleaning up resources. Not sure where you heard this, a link to a resource would be good.

Having a bit of trouble following your code:

  1. If you are calling DoSomething repeatedly, why are you disposing and creating a new AutoResetEvent? You can re-use the instance and clean up at the end of your loop.

  2. messageTarget is not used in the version that does not use Thread directly.

  3. In The version that uses Thread directly, you are creating and starting a new Thread in each loop - why? You're going to end up with a heap of running threads. As nothing is waiting for them to finish, they are all very likely to be running at the end of your loop. Eventually their sleep periods will end and they will exit, but your loop will finish way before the first thread sleep has finished.

I suspect that the handles are related to the running threads you have created. You need to wait for your threads to finish e.g. using Thread.Join. Your example is not really demonstrating anything useful with threads, it just creates lots of them.

Update

In response to your question update, typically you would use the ThreadPool, or the TPL (which uses a threadpool under the hood), instead of creating threads directly. Threadpools are there for the very reason that they manage thread resources efficiently.

If you create a Thread directly, some handles may be allocated (I believe the CLR is at liberty to re-use some threading resources, so the picture is complicated a little).

share|improve this answer
    
I should have stated I am trying to simulate some be behavior in our application, creating a new thread each time was to see what affect it had on the handle count of the application. Creating a new AutoResetEvent instead of reusing was just the last state I left the code in. I did try this but it did not seem to change the outcome of the handle count. – oliveromahony Aug 8 '11 at 9:24
    
@oliveromahony Ok, so if you wait for all your threads to exit after your loop, do you still see lots of handles? At the moment you are not synchronizing\waiting on all those threads you have created. – Tim Lloyd Aug 8 '11 at 9:27
    
doing this the handle count still comes in around the 40 mark, which is far larger than the original 7 handles without the threads. – oliveromahony Aug 8 '11 at 9:46
    
@oliveromahony Could you please add the full code to your question, including waiting for all your threads to exit, so we can have a look at it. Thanks. – Tim Lloyd Aug 8 '11 at 9:48
1  
I have added some comments on your edit. Still, you should typically use the ThreadPool for short-running tasks. – Tim Lloyd Aug 8 '11 at 10:11

If you use the threadpool, like in your original code, the threadpool will automatically limit the number of threads and events you are going to create. If you create threads explicitly, the BCL will do what is asked for: it will create all the threads. Each thread will create an handle, which will be closed when you don't use the thread object anymore (i.e. when it finishes to run. My guess is that you have to Join the thread in order to tell the CLR that you don't need the handle anymore, but this is just a guess).

share|improve this answer
    
the code is the same in both cases only difference is the delegate line – oliveromahony Aug 8 '11 at 9:27
    
Yes, it was clear. My point is that using the threadpool to queue a wark item will NOT always spawn a new thread (with its associated handle). Instead, creating a new thread most certainly will (as chibacity pointed out, managed threads are not always 1-to-1 with native threads..) – Lorenzo Dematté Aug 8 '11 at 10:33
    
Could you try to use the threadpool instead? How many handles do you see in this case? Just replace the new Thread... Start with a call to QueueUserWorkItem. – Lorenzo Dematté Aug 8 '11 at 10:37
    
this seems to do the trick, 7 handles is the result. – oliveromahony Aug 8 '11 at 10:59
    
So the ThreadPool is probably your best option :) Just for curiosity: in the Thread, replace Thread.Sleep with a fixed sleep (for example, 1000 ms). Then, do the same sleep in your for loop, just after the call to "DoSomething". You should see a lower number of handles (maybe even 7). If so, you are creating threads "too fast", so before a thread completes, another one is scheduled for execution, hence creating lots of threads and handles. – Lorenzo Dematté Aug 8 '11 at 11:30

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