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I have these classes:

class Field{
public:
    int X;

    void validate(){
        validator->validate(this);
    }

    void setValidator(Validator* v){
        validator = v;
    }

private:
    Validator* validator;
};

class DerivedField : public Field{
public:
    int Y;
}

class Validator {
public:
    virtual void validate(Field*); // do something with Field.X
};

class DerivedValidator : public Validator {
    virtual void validate(Field*); //do something with DerivedField.Y
};

I want to do this:

DerivedValidator* v = new DerivedValidator();
DerivedField* f = new DerivedFiled();
f->setValidator(v);

f->validate(); // Error, Validator::validate called instead of DerivedValidator::validate

Since It doesnt work, what can I do to avoid this:

class DerivedValidator{
    void validate(Field* f){
        DerivedField* dv = dynamic_cast<DerivedField*>(f);

        // do something with dv.Y
    }
};

Thank you.

Edit: Ok, all 'bugs' fixed now.

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Small correction: validator is a pointer, therefore you must use validator->validate instead of validator.validate. –  jweyrich Aug 8 '11 at 12:15
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5 Answers

First, by changing the method signature, you've created a new method that will hide the base class's. You need to have DerivedValidator's validate() method take a Field* parameter only.

Then, once you've added the virtual keyword to your methods, when you pass a DerivedField in, the correct method should be called.

You still won't be able to access the inherited values of DerivedField as you haven't told the base class anything about the derived class. ie, Field knows all about Validator types, but has no clue what a DerivedValidator is. Whatever you want to access in the derived class has to go via the base class signature.

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It's good that it doesn't work, since DerivedField doesn't inherit from Field. If you want to hack, you can just use C-style casts.

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Thank you for your answer, now its fixed. –  Mkcazi Aug 8 '11 at 13:05
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Rather than creating a parallel class hierarchy for fields and validators, you might be better off with a design something like this:

class Field{
   public:
   int X;

   virtual bool validate(Validator* v){
      return (v->isValid(X));
   }
}

class DerivedField : public Field{
   public:
   int Y;

   virtual bool validate(Validator* v){
      return (v->isValid(X) && v->isValid(Y));
   }
}

Each of your derived Validator classes can have different ideas of what is valid and what isn't.

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Thank you for your answer, but, what if I need access to more data members of field subclasses on validators subclasses? –  Mkcazi Aug 8 '11 at 13:05
    
Updated the answer for derived fields. It might turn out you don't need any derived validators at all. –  DanDan Aug 8 '11 at 14:23
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You code is full of small errors. First, your classes son't derive from anything, I assume DerivedField inherits from Field and DerivedValidator from Validator. Second, you need to write validator->validate, as it's a pointer. Third, Field::validate has no argument but you call f->validate(v). If these errors are corrected, then the only thing you got to do is make Validator::validate virtual and use your proposed solution (with the dynamic_cast).

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Thank you for your answer. Theres no way to avoid dynamic_cast then? –  Mkcazi Aug 8 '11 at 13:06
    
@Mkcazi There is surely, but it will take a bit more effort. This is a classical double dispatch problem I think. Look at some of the other answers for hints on this. –  Christian Rau Aug 8 '11 at 13:15
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you need to make Validator::validate() virtual.

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You can't just make functions virtual just so dynamic_cast works... There has to be a better reason behind. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 8 '11 at 12:12
    
having behind the provided example (which has hundreds of tiny bugs) this is a "at least" requirement. And I'm not sure whether he needs dynamic cast at all. –  khkarens Aug 8 '11 at 12:29
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