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I am able to parse strings containing date/time with time.strptime

>>> import time
>>> time.strptime('30/03/09 16:31:32', '%d/%m/%y %H:%M:%S')
(2009, 3, 30, 16, 31, 32, 0, 89, -1)

How can I parse a time string that contains milliseconds?

>>> time.strptime('30/03/09 16:31:32.123', '%d/%m/%y %H:%M:%S')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/lib/python2.5/_strptime.py", line 333, in strptime
    data_string[found.end():])
ValueError: unconverted data remains: .123
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5 Answers

up vote 83 down vote accepted

Python 2.6 added a new strftime/strptime macro %f, which does microseconds. Not sure if this is documented anywhere. But if you're using 2.6 or 3.0, you can do this:

time.strptime('30/03/09 16:31:32.123', '%d/%m/%y %H:%M:%S.%f')

Edit: I never really work with the time module, so I didn't notice this at first, but it appears that time.struct_time doesn't actually store milliseconds/microseconds. You may be better off using datetime, like this:

>>> from datetime import datetime
>>> a = datetime.strptime('30/03/09 16:31:32.123', '%d/%m/%y %H:%M:%S.%f')
>>> a.microsecond
123000
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Thanks docs.python.org/library/datetime.html : New in version 2.6: time and datetime objects support a %f format code which expands to the number of microseconds in the object, zero-padded on the left to six places. –  ilkinulas Mar 30 '09 at 18:01
3  
Woa I can tell the the Python docs needs updating. Docs for the time module doesn't say anything about %f. –  phunehehe Mar 22 '12 at 8:01
    
hm, zero-padded on the left would be wrong, no? –  K.-Michael Aye Nov 19 '12 at 3:02
2  
The Python docs, as of version 2.7.3, are a bit misleading. For strptime, %f can actually represent any number of decimal places, not just 6, as one might expect for microseconds. So the code above would parse 32.123 seconds and store it as 123,000µs, which is what we want. –  Michael Scheper Mar 5 '13 at 3:21
    
The number in %f is padded with zeros on the right (not left!) to 6 decimal places. 1 gets parsed to 100000, 12 gets parsed to 120000, and 1234567 produces ValueError: unconverted data remains: 7 –  user443854 Apr 4 '13 at 14:45
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I know this is an older question but I'm still using Python 2.4.3 and I needed to find a better way of converting the string of data to a datetime.

The solution if datetime doesn't support %f and without needing a try/except is:

    (dt, mSecs) = row[5].strip().split(".") 
    dt = datetime.datetime(*time.strptime(dt, "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S")[0:6])
    mSeconds = datetime.timedelta(microseconds = int(mSecs))
    fullDateTime = dt + mSeconds 

This works for the input string "2010-10-06 09:42:52.266000"

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Great! Thanks! :) –  Wok Nov 3 '10 at 16:30
    
dt.replace(microsecond=int(mSecs)) –  haridsv Sep 27 '12 at 9:51
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To give the code that nstehr's answer refers to (from its source):

def timeparse(t, format):
    """Parse a time string that might contain fractions of a second.

    Fractional seconds are supported using a fragile, miserable hack.
    Given a time string like '02:03:04.234234' and a format string of
    '%H:%M:%S', time.strptime() will raise a ValueError with this
    message: 'unconverted data remains: .234234'.  If %S is in the
    format string and the ValueError matches as above, a datetime
    object will be created from the part that matches and the
    microseconds in the time string.
    """
    try:
        return datetime.datetime(*time.strptime(t, format)[0:6]).time()
    except ValueError, msg:
        if "%S" in format:
            msg = str(msg)
            mat = re.match(r"unconverted data remains:"
                           " \.([0-9]{1,6})$", msg)
            if mat is not None:
                # fractional seconds are present - this is the style
                # used by datetime's isoformat() method
                frac = "." + mat.group(1)
                t = t[:-len(frac)]
                t = datetime.datetime(*time.strptime(t, format)[0:6])
                microsecond = int(float(frac)*1e6)
                return t.replace(microsecond=microsecond)
            else:
                mat = re.match(r"unconverted data remains:"
                               " \,([0-9]{3,3})$", msg)
                if mat is not None:
                    # fractional seconds are present - this is the style
                    # used by the logging module
                    frac = "." + mat.group(1)
                    t = t[:-len(frac)]
                    t = datetime.datetime(*time.strptime(t, format)[0:6])
                    microsecond = int(float(frac)*1e6)
                    return t.replace(microsecond=microsecond)

        raise
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My first thought was to try passing it '30/03/09 16:31:32.123' (with a period instead of a colon between the seconds and the milliseconds.) But that didn't work. A quick glance at the docs indicates that fractional seconds are ignored in any case...

Ah, version differences. This was reported as a bug and now in 2.6+ you can use "%S.%f" to parse it.

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That doesn't work; time.strptime just doesn't do milliseconds. –  DNS Mar 30 '09 at 17:44
    
Yeah, I saw that when I tried it, thus the edit. –  MarkusQ Mar 30 '09 at 17:47
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from python mailing lists: parsing millisecond thread. There is a function posted there that seems to get the job done, although as mentioned in the author's comments it is kind of a hack. It uses regular expressions to handle the exception that gets raised, and then does some calculations.

You could also try do the regular expressions and calculations up front, before passing it to strptime.

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yes, i know that thread. But i am looking for a simpler way. is there any module in the standart python lib that makes the time parsing with milliseconds? –  ilkinulas Mar 30 '09 at 17:48
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