Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Way cool, i'd just realised there is something called flood-color and lighting-color in CSS. Does anyone know what is a flood-color and lighting-color and what do they do?

What exactly do these mean?:

The ‘flood-color’ property indicates what color to use to flood the current filter primitive subregion. The keyword currentColor and ICC colors can be specified in the same manner as within a specification for the ‘fill’ and ‘stroke’ properties.

The ‘lighting-color’ property defines the color of the light source for filter primitives ‘feDiffuseLighting’ and ‘feSpecularLighting’.

How do we apply these so-called SVG effects? I've tried setting the lighting-color to red but there doesn't seem to be any effect whatsoever.

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

These are SVG filter effects.

The ‘lighting-color’ property defines the color of the light source for filter primitives ‘feDiffuseLighting’ and ‘feSpecularLighting’.

http://www.w3.org/TR/SVG/filters.html#LightingColorProperty

The ‘flood-opacity’ property defines the opacity value to use across the entire filter primitive subregion.

http://www.w3.org/TR/SVG/filters.html#FloodColorProperty

share|improve this answer
    
do they work like the SVG effects of background gradients? or rather how exactly do we apply it? i've tried setting them to different valid color values but none of it is showing any forms of differences – Pacerier Aug 8 '11 at 13:14
    
If you're looking for an intro tutorial I'd suggest Mike Sierra's docs.webplatform.org/wiki/svg/tutorials/smarter_svg_filters – Michael Mullany Mar 11 '14 at 2:35

The spec wasn't very helpful when I looked this up.
Try https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Applying_SVG_effects_to_HTML_content

There are three styles you may apply: you may use mask, clip-path, or filter.

The only time I've ever needed to use this was when I wanted to invert graphics using XOR.

Define the SVG filter:

<svg>
    <filter id="xor" x="0" y="0" width="100%" height="100%">
        <feFlood flood-color="#ff1493" result="flood"/>
        <feComposite operator="xor" in="SourceAlpha" in2="flood"/>
    </filter>
</svg>

Apply using CSS:

<style>
    .stylename{
        mask: url(#xor);
    }
</style>
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.