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I am looking for a web-based WYSIWYG (or WYSIWYM) editor like TinyMCE or WMD Editor (used to write this question) that supports users to write mathematical formulas. I have looked at LaTeX a little bit but it has a learning curve and I am not sure if support for MathML is extensive. Ideally I would also like to avoid having to rewrite an editor and would rather just pick one off the shelf.

Would like to know if any of you have dealt with a similar situation and what solution you adopted/built.

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Question is similar to stackoverflow.com/questions/7433540/… –  Malartre Nov 9 '12 at 5:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

http://www.dessci.com/en/ has the software to do exactly what you want.

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It's a good software, unfortunately it's not web based –  aleemb Mar 31 '09 at 13:44
    
Yes it is, look at dessci.com/en/products/webeq. –  Roel Mar 31 '09 at 15:01
    
Thanks, missed that. –  aleemb Apr 25 '09 at 17:08
5  
"WebEQ Developers Suite Reaches End of Life" –  Joseph Turian Jul 10 '10 at 20:41
    
It's been renamed/repackaged as MathFlow apparently: dessci.com/en/products/mathflow –  HDave Feb 7 '12 at 17:09

I used texvc in a project a while back (what wikipedea uses) and it was reasonable, but it isn't really WYSIWYG. On the other hand, I prefer that since in many cases it's easier to specify what you mean than draw it.

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I was looking for something similar and came across this question. Then I was excited to find Mathquill, via the Wikipedia page on formula editors.

I've used a bunch of different formula editors, from MS Equation Editor to Google Docs' to LyX, and this is probably the most usable/fluid of all of them for simply banging out formulas. And it's web-based and GPL. This thing is much nicer than Google Docs' formula editor, at least.

Still leaves plenty of things to be desired, e.g. so far I've found: bolding, entering things like bra-kets, \hat, undo/redo history, mouse drag selection, etc. But I'm impressed by what's already in there. Anyway, it's just a few Javascript files, and on github.

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see here DragMath

http://www.dragmath.bham.ac.uk/index.html

which is already used by Moodle and other sites.

And its Open Source

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All you have to do to make this work is convince the entire planet to install Java on their computers. –  HDave Feb 7 '12 at 17:10

I'm working on a tinyMCE plugin for basic math edition using Mathquill. You can take a look:

https://github.com/gabmolina/tinymce-mathquill-plugin

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