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Yes, I'm one of those fellows that is learning C++ coming from Java, being spoiled with an automatic garbage collector. There's a particular situation where I'm wondering whether I'm leaking memory or not. Let's consider in C++:

bool *test = new bool(false);
test = new bool(true);
delete test;

Am I leaking memory here? Or should I first call delete before assigning a new value? Like this:

bool *test = new bool(false);
delete test;
test = new bool(true);
delete test;

My gut feeling tells me the first is right, as the pointer test points at the same address in memory, and assigning a new value to its variable, will not change this address. Or does the new operator allocate a different address in memory? Can anyone give me a clue, or did I get it wrong all together?

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11  
Re: "Yes, I'm one of those fellows that is learning c++ coming from Java." Then I highly recommend picking up a good introductory C++ book and pretend you've never learned Java. C++ is not Java. Attempting to program like Java in C++ will only lead to tears and frustration. It's like using RegEx to parse HTML. –  In silico Aug 8 '11 at 13:28
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"Spoiled" is a euphemism, if I have ever heard one. –  Kerrek SB Aug 8 '11 at 13:28
    
It's quite possible that's exactly what he's doing. –  Louis Marascio Aug 8 '11 at 13:32
    
Do you really need the 'bool' to be allocated on the heap? Especially single values of build-in types are very uncommon to be allocated on the heap. In a normal C++ program "new" is used much rarer than in a common Java program! –  Ludger Sprenker Aug 8 '11 at 13:44
    
C++ has its own GC system that acts at a much finer grain than Javas. You just have to use it. Use std::shared_ptr<int> rather than int* and all your problems go away as the garbage collector now works. But you don;t even need to dynamically allocate the objects. Just use bool rather than bool* –  Loki Astari Aug 8 '11 at 15:34

7 Answers 7

Yes you are leaking, and the c++ way to do it is:

bool test = false;
test = true; 

// ta-da - no leak.

You could do the second approach - however you're likely to draw lots of frowning...

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@amit well, for built-in types I'd stick with Nim's option. –  hexa Aug 8 '11 at 13:32
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@amit: And why would a person return a reference to a local variable? –  In silico Aug 8 '11 at 13:35
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@amit: Correct. I think what Nim is trying to get at is that automatic allocation of variables are preferable to dynamic allocation. –  In silico Aug 8 '11 at 13:39
1  
@In Silicio, Nim: I agree static allocation is preferable when possible, but it is not always the case. it seems to me the OP is indeed a beginner, and he's currently learning dynamic allocation. a solution of "use static allocation" when learning dynamic allocation is not a solution, in my opinion. –  amit Aug 8 '11 at 13:41
2  
@amit It seems more likely in my mind, that coming from reference-counted, garbage-collected, "new everything" Java, the OP isn't used to the idiomatic C++ way of declaring local variables. –  Mark B Aug 8 '11 at 13:43

Yes, exactly, you have to delete before you overwrite the address. Or better yet allocate on stack or use a smart pointer.

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Yes, you are leaking memory. For every new there should be a subsequent delete. If you overwrite a pointer with a new address then you lose the opportunity to pair the allocation with a delete.

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Yes, your first example is actually leaking memory. Every call to new must have a matched call to delete (unless the new failed).

In C++ the normal way to do what you appear to be trying to do is to simply declare the bool locally:

bool b = truel
b = false;

If however you actually need dynamic allocation for some reason, there are smart pointers that manage the memory so you don't have to worry about calling delete. You can look up scoped_ptr, unique_ptr and shared_ptr.

Finally, C++ has a great standard library that handles many possible containers and algorithms, preventing you from having to reinvent them and saving you from having to deal with dynamic allocation in a wide variety of cases.

If you're serious about learning C++ I would pick out one of the books from the SO C++ book list and learn from the ground up rather than trying to transfer Java idioms to C++ (it just won't work well).

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You have indeed been spoiled.

The problem is that you do not differentiate between an address and a variable.


bool *test = new bool(false);
  • Allocate space with automatic duration for test
  • Allocate space with dynamic duration for a bool
  • Write false into this space
  • Store the address of this space into test

test = new bool(true);
  • Allocate space with dynamic duration for a bool
  • Write true into this space
  • Store the address of this space into test (the address previously stored is ruthlessly discarded, since it is not stored anywhere else, the memory it points to can never be reclaimed, which means you have a leak).

delete test;
  • Read the address stored into test
  • Deallocate the space at this address

My gut feeling tells me the first is right, as the pointer test points at the same address in memory, and assigning a new value to its variable, will not change this address. Or does the new operator allocate a different address in memory?

Semantically, you should consider that new always return an address to a new space in memory (Obviously false, as memory is reused). This is why each call to new need to be matched by exactly one call to delete.

Therefore your gut feeling is wrong, new does not create "just" a variable. If you are coming from Java, this may be shocking indeed, and you'll need a strong tutorial to grasp the finer points of programming.

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bool is a built in datatype.Why do you need to allocate memory like that?You can easily allocate on stack

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Yes, you are leaking memory in the first case. The second way is the proper way to do it. In your first case...

When you call new the second time, the first allocation goes out of scope, but still exists. In Java, this is fine because the GC will clean it up for you. However, in C++, there's no such way with raw spointers.

Each call to new must also have a call to delete at some point. Also, after you delete a pointer, set it to null or 0. This will prevent you from accidently deleting invalid memory.

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