Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can successfully connect to an oracle database and print out the list of all table names using the getAllTableNames() method.

My next Idea is to filter specific tables and display all of their columns.

I am running this query at the moment (I am including the entire method.)

static void getLengths(){
String query = "SELECT column_name from user_tab_columns where table_name = '<MytableName>'"

try{
ResultSet rs = db.runQuery(query);
System.out.println(rs):
} catch (Exception ex) {
System.out.println(ex);
//Seems to be successful
}
} //End of Method

In the System.out Window I am receiving this which makes me think I just need to view my result set somehow?

oracle.jdbc.driver.DcrollableResultSet@(different number everytime I run code)

Is my result set hiding somewhere? What is the best way to go about viewing it?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

System.out.println(rs) just prints out the class name and handle of the ResultSet object. This is pretty useless.

You need to loop through the result set and read the appropriate fields. Generally you write something like:

ResultSet rs=db.runQuery(query) // I don't know where this function is coming from, but okay
while (rs.next())
{
  String myColumn=rs.getString("column_name");
  System.out.println(myColumn);
}
rs.close();

You might want to read up on JDBC in general, and look at the Java Docs for Connection, Statement, and ResultSet.

share|improve this answer

You have to iterate over your ResultSet to get the values. Do something like that

while(rs.next()) {System.out.println(rs.getString("COLUMN_NAME"));}

share|improve this answer

ResultSet javadoc states

A table of data representing a database result set, which is usually generated by executing a statement that queries the database.

So, you'll have to use the appropriate getXXX(int index) methods where XXX is your equivalent Java Datatype. And don't forget to invoke next() before doing anything else!

Read Retrieving and Modifying Values from Result Sets to see an example of what you're trying to accomplish.

share|improve this answer

You will need to step through the result set, very rusty on my java, but you can probably call "toString()" on the resultset to at least show you what was returned although its not going to be very usable.

System.out.println(rs.toString())
share|improve this answer
1  
This prints the same thing as System.out.println(rs) :) –  sealz Aug 8 '11 at 14:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.