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When is it a good idea to use factory methods within an object instead of a Factory class?

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11 Answers 11

I like thinking about design pattens in terms of my classes being 'people,' and the patterns are the ways that the people talk to each other.

So, to me the factory pattern is like a hiring agency. You've got someone that will need a variable number of workers. This person may know some info they need in the people they hire, but that's it.

So, when they need a new employee, they call the hiring agency and tell them what they need. Now, to actually hire someone, you need to know a lot of stuff - benefits, eligibility verification, etc. But the person hiring doesn't need to know any of this - the hiring agency handles all of that.

In the same way, using a Factory allows the consumer to create new objects without having to know the details of how they're created, or what their dependencies are - they only have to give the information they actually want.

public interface IThingFactory
{
    Thing GetThing(string theString);
}

public class ThingFactory : IThingFactory
{
    public Thing GetThing(string theString)
    {
        return new Thing(theString, firstDependency, secondDependency);
    }
}

So, now the consumer of the ThingFactory can get a Thing, without having to know about the dependencies of the Thing, except for the string data that comes from the consumer.

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53  
Very nice illustrative explanation. Write a book in that style! :) –  ciscoheat May 31 '10 at 18:01
6  
Where does the concrete implementation of GetThing() retrieve the values of firstDependency and secondDependency? –  Mikeyg36 May 31 '13 at 18:09
9  
Could someone tell me how this answers the OP's question? This merely describes what 'Factory Pattern' is and then add an example of 'Factory Method', which is just one of three 'Factory Patterns'. In another word, I see no comparison anywhere. I would recommend people who are scratching their head after this answer to see this blog post by Corey Broderick, but even this explanation does not answer when to use which. –  Forethinker Sep 7 '13 at 4:30
2  
OP's question clearly mentions within an object instead of a Factory class. I think he meant the scenario where you make the ctor private and use a static method to instantiate the class (create an object). But to follow this example one must instantiate the ThingFactory class first to get Thing objects, which makes this a Factory class in effect. –  Nero theZero Apr 21 at 9:13
2  
You treat people as objects! –  Julian Jul 16 at 15:05

Factory methods should be considered as an alternative to constructors - mostly when constructors aren't expressive enough, ie.

class Foo{
  public Foo(bool withBar);
}

is not as expressive as:

class Foo{
  public static Foo withBar();
  public static Foo withoutBar();
}

Factory classes are useful when you need a complicated process for constructing the object, when the construction need a dependency that you do not want for the actual class, when you need to construct different objects etc.

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Where is the Factory class here? –  Koray Tugay Jul 16 at 15:48
1  
@KorayTugay: There is no factory class, only factory methods. The question is about when to use factory methods instead of a factory class. But factory methods are more an alternative to constructors than an alternative to factory classes. (I do not know why the top answer is rated so highly despite only talking about factory classes). –  Rasmus Faber Jul 16 at 16:51
    
Ah thanks. you are right.. –  Koray Tugay Jul 16 at 17:06

One situation where I personally find separate Factory classes to make sense is when the final object you are trying to create relies on several other objects. E.g, in PHP: Suppose you have a House object, which in turn has a Kitchen and a Livingroom object, and the Livingroom object has a TV object inside aswell.

The simplest method to achive this is having each object create their children on their construct method, but if the properties are relatively nested, when your House fails creating you will probably spend some time trying to isolate exactly what is failing.

The alternative is to do the following (dependency injection, if you like the fancy term):

$TVObj = new TV($param1, $param2, $param3);
$LivingroomObj = new LivingRoom($TVObj, $param1, $param2);
$KitchenroomObj = new Kitchen($param1, $param2);
$HouseObj = new House($LivingroomObj, $KitchenroomObj);

Here if the process of creating a House fails there is only one place to look, but having to use this chunk every time one wants a new House is far from convenient. Enter the Factories:

class HouseFactory {
    public function create() {
        $TVObj = new TV($param1, $param2, $param3);
        $LivingroomObj = new LivingRoom($TVObj, $param1, $param2);
        $KitchenroomObj = new Kitchen($param1, $param2);
        $HouseObj = new House($LivingroomObj, $KitchenroomObj);

        return $HouseObj;
    }
}

$houseFactory = new HouseFactory();
$HouseObj = $houseFactory->create();

Thanks to the factory here the process of creating a House is abstracted (in that you don't need to create and set up every single dependency when you just want to create a House) and at the same time centralized which makes it easier to maintain. There are other reasons why using separate Factories can be beneficial (eg testability) but I find this specific use case to illustrate best how Factory classes can be useful.

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How would someone do a unit test on this though? I thought using the "new" keyword in a class was considered bad practice because it can't be unit tested. Or is a factory meant to be a bit of an exception to that rule? –  AgmLauncher Oct 8 '13 at 3:58
    
@AgmLauncher I had the same question as well when I got started with unit testing, check out: stackoverflow.com/questions/10128780/… –  Mahn Oct 8 '13 at 21:36
1  
Didn't get this. How exactly the params for creating different objects are passed to the HouseFactory class? –  Nero theZero Apr 21 at 10:14
    
@NerotheZero I omitted that in the example for the sake of simplicity, but you would essentially either have them hardcoded inside the class, or pass them as arguments of HouseFactory::create. It'd be perfectly okay for instance to have a create call such as $houseFactory->create($TVParam1, $TVParam2, $livingRoomParam1, $livingRoomParam2); etc. –  Mahn May 4 at 21:11
    
@Mahn, Wouldn't you end up having alot of params in the end? –  Pacerier Jun 17 at 12:25

It is important to clearly differentiate the idea behind using factory or factory method. Both are meant to address mutually exclusive different kind of object creation problems.

Let's be specific about "factory method":

First thing is that, when you are developing library or APIs which in turn will be used for further application development, then factory method is one of the best selection for creation pattern. Reason behind, we know that when to create a object of required functionality(s) but type of object will remain undecided or it will be decided ob dynamic parameters being passed.

Now the point is, approximately same can be achieved by using factory pattern itself but one huge drawback will introduce into the system if factory pattern will be used for above highlighted problem, it is that your logic of crating different objects(sub classes objects) will be specific to some business condition so in future when you need to extend your library's functionality for other platforms(In more technically, you need to add more sub classes of basic interface or abstract class so factory will return thos object also in addition to existing one based on some dynamic parameter) then every time you need to change(extend) the logic of factory class which will be costly operation and not good from design perspective. On the other side, if "factory method" pattern will be used to perform the same thing then you just need to create additional functionality(sub classes) and get it registered dynamically by injection which doesn't require changes in your base code.

interface Deliverable 
{
    /*********/
}

abstract class DefaultProducer 
{

    public void taskToBeDone() 
    {   
        Deliverable deliverable = factoryMethodPattern();
    }
    protected abstract Deliverable factoryMethodPattern();
}

class SpecificDeliverable implements Deliverable 
{
 /***SPECIFIC TASK CAN BE WRITTEN HERE***/
}

class SpecificProducer extends DefaultProducer 
{
    protected Deliverable factoryMethodPattern() 
    {
        return new SpecificDeliverable();
    }
}

public class MasterApplicationProgram 
{
    public static void main(String arg[]) 
    {
        DefaultProducer defaultProducer = new SpecificProducer();
        defaultProducer.taskToBeDone();
    }
}
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They're also useful when you need several "constructors" with the same parameter type but with different behavior.

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It's really a matter of taste. Factory classes can be abstracted/interfaced away as necessary, whereas factory methods are lighter weight (and also tend to be testable, since they don't have a defined type, but they will require a well-known registration point, akin to a service locator but for locating factory methods).

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Factory classes are useful for when the object type that they return has a private constructor, when different factory classes set different properties on the returning object, or when a specific factory type is coupled with its returning concrete type.

WCF uses ServiceHostFactory classes to retrieve ServiceHost objects in different situations. The standard ServiceHostFactory is used by IIS to retrieve ServiceHost instances for .svc files, but a WebScriptServiceHostFactory is used for services that return serializations to JavaScript clients. ADO.NET Data Services has its own special DataServiceHostFactory and ASP.NET has its ApplicationServicesHostFactory since its services have private constructors.

If you only have one class that's consuming the factory, then you can just use a factory method within that class.

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I hope this read is also useful to you about Factory design pattern in PHP

http://www.mixedwaves.com/2009/02/implementing-factory-design-pattern/

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5  
You should provide some description too with that link. SO in not all about displaying links. –  Chris May 24 '11 at 19:00

Factory classes are more heavyweight, but give you certain advantages. In cases when you need to build your objects from multiple, raw data sources they allow you to encapsulate only the building logic (and maybe the aggregation of the data) in one place. There it can be tested in abstract without being concerned with the object interface.

I have found this a useful pattern, particularly where I am unable to replace and inadequate ORM and want to efficiently instantiate many objects from DB table joins or stored procedures.

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I came across an awesome article to understand the factory method pattern: Check this: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/492900/From-No-Factory-to-Factory-Method

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I'm quoting from the book PHP Masters.

The factory pattern is perfect for instantiating one of many variants in a driver-based-setup, such as different storage engines for your configuration, session, or cache. The biggest value in the factory pattern is that it can encapsulate what would normally be a lot of object setup into a single, simple method call. For example, when setting up a logger object, you need to set up the log type (file-based, MySQL, or SQLite, for example), log location, and potentially, items like credentials.

The factory pattern is used to augment the new operator when you're instantiating objects, and lets you unify the complexities that might occur in setting up an object, or many types of similar objects.

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